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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for December, 1889 AD or search for December, 1889 AD in all documents.

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Golden Fleece, and she sailed for Winsor's regular line for San Francisco. The ship Pilgrim,—long may she be remembered as the last of all the vessels built and launched on the shores of the Mystic! She was constructed at J. T. Foster's yard for Henry Hastings & Co. Of nearly a thousand tons, launched on Dec. 3, 1873, she sailed to Hong Kong Feb. 14, 1874, with a cargo of ice, and was commanded by Capt. Frank Fowle, making the passage in one hundred and twenty-one days. Afterward, in December, 1889, was sold to Daniel Bacon, of New York. She was constructed of finest material, sailed the world over, making fair passages, and was lost. Ship-building. In the early days of ship-building, work in the yards began with sunrise and ended at sunset, with allowance of time for meals. In later times the work hours were from 7 in the morning until 6 at night with an hour's nooning. Usually about sixty men were employed building a ship. They were the ship-carpenters, the calkers, t