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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 374 374 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 63 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 53 53 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1890 AD or search for 1890 AD in all documents.

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rivers. He resigned his commission after the disastrous Red River expedition of 1864, and was reelected to Congress. In 1890, owing to an increasing mental disorder, he was obliged to retire from public life. He died at his home in Waltham, Septeigned from the army in June, 1864. He became interested in railroad building and was governor of Arizona (1878– 1882). In 1890, he was reappointed major-general and was retired with that rank on April 28th. He died July 13, 1890. First Army Corp diplomatic mission to South America in 1867, and was minister to Spain, 1869-1873. He was sheriff of New York County, in 1890, and Democratic member of Congress, 1892-94, as well as president of the New Federal Generals—No. 1 Arkansas serving with the Twenty-sixth and other infantry regiments. He was aide-de-Camp to General Sherman from 1875 to 1880. In 1890 he was made brigadier-general, and became major-general, in 1894. He held several public positions of honor, and was reti
ns-Mississippi Territory. Theophilus Hunter, Holmes, defender of the James River in 1862 and Arkansas in 1863. Join Clifford, Pemberton, Baffled the assailants of Vicksburg through three campaigns, yielding to only Heavy Odds. From 1887 to 1890, he was governor of Georgia. He was commander-in-chief of the United Confederate Veterans after 1900. He died at Miami, Florida, January 9, 1904. Third Corps—Army of Northern Virginia Created from three divisions of the First and Second corly in the Shenandoah in 1864, where he was wounded at the Opequon. He was in command of the Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, from March, 1865, until the surrender, replacing Wade Hampton, who went to the Army of Tennessee. From 1886 to 1890 he was governor of Virginia, and, under appointment of President Cleveland, consul-general at Havana from 1896 to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. President McKinley appointed him major-general of volunteers in 1898 and placed him at the
neteenth century had passed the zenith of its career. Its membership remained about the same in numbers after its first great leap and subsequent subsidence, varying between 25,000 and 50,000 from 1870 to 1880. During the decade between 1880 and 1890 it rose to its highest number of 409,--489. Since then it has decreased, through death, in very great part, until, at the national encampment of 1910, at Atlantic City, it had diminished to 213,901. Its posts exist throughout the length and breaum of more than fifteen hundred, but with the passage of years many have ceased to be active. While the organization was perfected in New Orleans, the first reunion of United Confederate Veterans was held in Chattanooga, Tennessee, July 3 to 5, 1890. To this reunion invitations were extended to veterans of both armies and to citizens of the Republic, and the dates purposely included Independence Day. The first comment both in the North and South was, Why keep up the strife or the memory o