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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 374 374 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 63 63 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 53 53 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904. You can also browse the collection for 1890 AD or search for 1890 AD in all documents.

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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
in England, as well as in America. This book out-Crusoes Crusoe. Its hero is cast upon one of the unknown islands of the Pacific, with no friendly well-stored wreck at hand. With almost nothing but his hands and his scientific knowledge, the lonely sailor makes tools and house, gunpowder, bricks, a water wheel, a blast-furnace, even a sub-marine boat and a flying machine. Rich in real estate and in discovered gold, this modern Selkirk is properly rescued at last. The Log of the Maryland (1890), in the guise of fiction, is in effect an account of one of Captain Frazar's own voyages. The routine and adventures of a long ocean journey are faithfully told. The sea-fight with Chinese pirates, with which the story closes, bristles with excitement. Perhaps Mr. Frazar's books are as remarkable for their varied knowledge as for any one quality, though they are interesting, as well. In his active life as a sailor, and in his excursions into French and English literature, he gathered t