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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1893 AD or search for 1893 AD in all documents.

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Thomas, Wiles, Tyler, Simmons, Drillard, Ducat, Barnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major William McKinley, President, 1897-1901. many cases between fighters and non-combatants. This is true, even when the latter are represented in full army overcoats, with swords and the like, as was customary to some extent with postmasters, quartermasters, commissariat and hospital attendants. The features are distinctive of the men who have stood up under fire, and undergone the even severer ordeal of submission to a will working for the common good, involving the sacrifice
became head of the Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. He made a famous raid on General Grant's commissariat, capturing some twenty-five hundred head of cattle. In February, 1865, he was made lieutenant-general, and commanded the cavalry in the Army of Tennessee, as well as a division of that of the Army of Northern Virginia. After the war, he strongly advocated the policy of conciliation. In 1876, he was governor of South Carolina; from 1878 to 1891, United States senator, and from 1893 to 1897, United States commissioner of railroads. He died in Columbia, South Carolina, April 11, 1902. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee (U. S.M. A. 1856) was born in Clermont, Virginia, November 19, 1835. He served against the Indians, and was cavalry instructor at West Point until he resigned his commission in May, 1861, to enter the Confederate service, becoming adjutant-general in Ewell's brigade. He was made major-general September 3, 1863. He had a brigade and division in the cavalr
ultivate national as well as Southern fraternity, and will condemn narrow-mindedness and prejudice and passion, and cultivate that broader and higher and nobler sentiment which would write on the grave of every soldier who fell on our side, Here lies an American hero, a martyr to the right as his conscience conceived it. The reunions, thus happily inaugurated, became at once popular and have been held every year except the first appointment at Birmingham, Alabama, which was postponed from 1893 to 1894. No event in the South is comparable in widespread interest to these reunions. Only the large cities have been able to entertain the visitors, which range in number between fifty thousand and one hundred thousand. The greatest of all gatherings was at Richmond, Virginia, June 30, 1907, when the superb monument to the only President of the Confederacy was unveiled. There were probably a hundred thousand people at the dedication. An idea of the magnitude of these reunion conventi