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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 198 198 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 32 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 18 18 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1896 AD or search for 1896 AD in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
tudents there numbered 170 with eight teachers. Having steadily grown, Berea in 1896 had 460 students and 23 instructors. In 1903, 972 students and 52 instructors, of a high order, at Selma, Ala., had in 1870 but 35 pupils and two teachers. In 1896 there were 92 pupils. 6. Claflin University was organized in 1869 at Orangebunic Arts. It was recorded in 1895 as nonsectarian, having 570 students. In 1896 the two institutions, Claflin University proper and the Institute for Agriculturreedmen's Aid Society, had in 1870 92 scholars and 5 teachers. It had risen in 1896 to a total of 165 scholars, all in professional courses. The first building uloh Institute appears to have replaced it, having four teachers and 95 pupils in 1896. 22. The Normal and Manual Labor School just beginning in 1869 at Tougaloo, Mred church, with an outfit of $2,000 and nothing besides. Washington wrote in 1896: Beginning July 4, 1881, without a dollar except the annual appropriation ($2,00
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
ciated with me some noble men, and the institution has been steadily progressing until more than 500 of the youth of the mountains are receiving excellent and systematic training. The organizing of the institution, the raising of funds for its plant, the establishment of an endowment, and keeping up the running expenses have been for eleven years a decided labor of love. The continued success of this enterprise as a last work of an active life I greatly desire and earnestly pray for. In 1896 was the first presidential campaign in which I participated. I had made up my mind, as soon as I was retired from the active list of the army, that I would engage in political work as an example to my children, and also as I wished to carry out my theory as to the importance of citizenship. I began by canvassing Vermont and then Maine, making many addresses in different parts of those two States. Suddenly I received a dispatch from my friend, General R. A. Alger, entreating me to join his