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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 198 198 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 32 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 18 18 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1896 AD or search for 1896 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
34. Lieutenant-Colonel, 1864. Chief of Ordnance, Hindman's Corps, Army of Tennessee. Harold Borland. 1887. Born North Carolina. Appointed Arkansas. 41. Captain, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Brigadier-General Chalmers, 1861, Army of the Mississippi. 1861 (May). Llewellyn G. Hoxton. 1893. Born District of Columbia. Appointed at Large. 6. Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding Hoxton's Battalion Artillery, Hardee's Corps, Army of Tennessee. Nathaniel R. Chambliss. 1896. Born Virginia. Appointed Tennessee. 9. Major, June 9, 1862. Chief of ordnance, Hardee's Division, 1862; in 1863-‘64 commanding arsenal, Charleston, S. C. Charles E. Patterson. 1903. Born Indiana. Appointed Arkansas. 16. Killed April 6, 1862, at Shiloh. Charles C. Campbell.* 1911. Born Missouri. Appointed Missouri. 24. Captain of artillery and Major First Missouri Infantry, Mathias W. Henry. 1931. Born Kentucky. Appointed Kentucky. 44, 1861 (June.)
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
of Education, after first excluding it, reversed its action, and put on the list of histories to be used in our public schools, the work entitled Our Country, by Messrs. Cooper, Estill & Lemon. And with the profoundest respect for each member of the Board, we think they committed an unintentional mistake. We understand the Board based its later action on the ground that the edition of this work, published in 1901, contained important amendments, as well as omissions, not found in that of 1896, which was, in our opinion, so justly criticised and condemned by the late Dr. Hunter McGuire and Rev. S. Taylor Martin, D. D., in their reports to this camp in 1899. Whilst it is true that this latest edition has been freed from many of the objections then urged against the former edition, and it is apparent that the authors have profited by these criticisms, and tried to adapt this new issue to the sentiments which gave them birth; yet there are such fundamental objections to this work sti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
home more than twenty years ago when he had become sick, penniless, and friendless, after having given the prime of his life, health and wealth to the cause of humanity. There he had been cared for entirely at the expense of the village, till in 1896 the Empress of Russia granted a pension which enabled him to defray it in part. Herr Zeimer had called to inform him that the administrators of the Nobel fund for the advancement of scientific and humanitarian propaganda and investigation had e Christianity of the Southern people at that time. References:U. S. Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, Appendix Part I., Med. Vol., p. 118. Medical and Surgical Journal of the Confederate States. War Record Journal, New York and Lexington, Ky., 1893-6, Vol. II, page 124. Confederate Military History, Vol. III, (Virginia), p. 246. Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Jefferson Davis. 1418 Fourteenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C., March 20, 1902.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
vannah. Well, the war passed, McRae returned from the Confederate army, living for many years on his farm in Telfair county. He forgot all about his experience in gathering up the cargo of the Wanderer until old age began to tell on him. Then he wondered whether or not the government would still allow his claim for services. He brought the matter to the attention of Judge Henry G. Turner, who for sixteen years represented the Eleventh Georgia District in Congress, with the result that in 1896, just thirty-seven years after the landing of the last cargo of human beings on our shores, the latter introduced a bill before the Fifty-fourth Congress providing for the payment of $700 to John R. McRae for services rendered the government in 1860 in gathering together the last cargo of African slaves landed within the borders of the United States. The bill passed both houses unanimously. Northern and Southern members voting the compensation due McRae for services actually rendered. McR