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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 249 249 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 8 8 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 6 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. You can also browse the collection for 1897 AD or search for 1897 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
der the personal tuition of Maj. Whitney, and others members of the Sons of Veterans. In January, 1897, new regulations were promulgated regarding target practice, by which members of the militia were obliged to qualify as marksmen or be discharged. These rules had a tendency to stimulate the attendance and interest in the Light Guard, which Capt. Henderson and Capt. Wescott, his successor, worked hard to bring about. The Light Guard attended the inauguration of President McKinley in 1897. In this peaceful advance to the capital, thirty-six years after the gray-coated minute men started for Washington, the uniform of the company consisted of dark-blue coat with light-blue trimmings, black helmet with spike and eagle on point, light-blue trousers, and woven cartridge belt with brass plate. The men were armed with the latest pattern of Springfield rifles—voted of no particular value a year later. The Army and Navy journal says, Massachusetts was represented by three of the
ay State Monthly, besides several of the daily papers. Of especial interest are his articles in the Bay State Monthly on The Washington Elm and the Eliot Oak, February, 1884, as foreshadowing the greater work-Typical Elms and Other Trees of Massachusetts, which came several years later. In November, 1884, he contributed to the Bay State Monthly a carefully prepared paper on the Middlesex Canal. This same was later revised and appeared in its new form in the Medford Historical Register in 1897. His style of writing is well indicated in this article—clear, concise, and with a smoothness that pleases. The organization of the Middlesex Institute, which he was instrumental in founding, gave definiteness and direction to his scientific studies, and fixed in him a more definite purpose for greater undertakings than any he had tried before. His position as president of the Middlesex Institute gave him an intimate acquaintance with the leading botanists of the region, and soon he, in