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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 6th, 1897 AD or search for April 6th, 1897 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
Burning of Richmond. [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, April 25, 1897.] Incidents of the City's evacuation described. Last to Cross Mayo's Bridge. Experiences of an officer on the retreat. Sunny side, Albemarle Co., Va., April 6, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch . During part of the month of February and during March, 1865, the Second Battalion of Virginia Reserves (boys between sixteen and eighteen, and old men between forty-five and fifty, commanded by the undersigned) were stationed in the City of Richmond on guard duty, having been withdrawn from the lines nearly opposite Fort Harrison, about the 15th of February. On the afternoon of Saturday, the 1st of April, 1865, I went down on a small steamer to Wilton, the home of my friend, Colonel W. C. Knight, and spent Sunday with him and his family. I expected to return to Richmond early Monday morning. During Sunday all was quiet on the north side of James river, but away to the south we could hear sounds t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
How Taylor, Hayne, Pinckney and Gadsden Holmes died. Colonel Edward McCrady, after Consultation with Captains Armstrong, Kelly, Hasell, Hutson and Dr. Frost, tells the story of the Heroism of the four Young South Carolinians who fell at Cold Harbor supporting the colors of the 1st regiment, S. C. V.—The gallant Dominick Spellman, of the Irish Volunteers. The following interesting letter of Colonel Edward McCrady to Mrs. Thomas Taylor, of Columbia, explains itself: Charleston, April 6, 1897. My Dear Mrs. Taylor: It will make rather a long letter to answer your inquiries of the 25th ultimo. I will, however, endeavor to do so as briefly as I can. I should premise that, though present at the battle of Cold Harbor on the June 27, 1862, I was not on duty with the regiment, the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, of which I was then major. I had been ill in Richmond for some weeks when the seven days battle around the city began, and though I managed to get out in a carriage