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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 25th, 1897 AD or search for April 25th, 1897 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
Burning of Richmond. [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, April 25, 1897.] Incidents of the City's evacuation described. Last to Cross Mayo's Bridge. Experiences of an officer on the retreat. Sunny side, Albemarle Co., Va., April 6, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch . During part of the month of February and during March, 1865, the Second Battalion of Virginia Reserves (boys between sixteen and eighteen, and old men between forty-five and fifty, commanded by the undersigned) were stationed in the City of Richmond on guard duty, having been withdrawn from the lines nearly opposite Fort Harrison, about the 15th of February. On the afternoon of Saturday, the 1st of April, 1865, I went down on a small steamer to Wilton, the home of my friend, Colonel W. C. Knight, and spent Sunday with him and his family. I expected to return to Richmond early Monday morning. During Sunday all was quiet on the north side of James river, but away to the south we could hear sounds th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Eugene Waggaman. [from the New Orleans Picayune, April 25, 1897.] Colonel 10th Louisiana Infantry, C. S. Army. A Sketch of this gallant and useful life. A massive figure in Louisiana history passed peacefully out of this life, in this city last night, a massive figure in the history of the gigantic struggle between the North and the South. Colonel Eugene Waggaman died, venerable, and crowned with the honor of one of the greatest records of the late war. If Malvern Hill had had the poet who immortalized the Six Hundred, Colonel Waggaman would not be less known throughout the world to-day than they, and as long as history conserves the names of the brave, his name will make the Louisianian proud. The Colonel's death was quite sudden. Two days ago he was enjoying better health than usually falls to the lot of a man of seventy years. He was stopping at the home of one of his children, at No. 5340 Pitt street. When his coffee was handed him yesterday morning, before he had