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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 4th, 1897 AD or search for July 4th, 1897 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
John B., killed at Cedar Mountain. Snoddy, John S., died since the war. Shores, Thomas, died since the war. Wootton, John and A. W., died since the war. Number killed during the war16 Number died during the war18 Number died since the war21 Number still living48 —— Total103 There were twenty-eight wounded and five who lost limbs during the war, and one had his leg, which was wounded, amputated since the war. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which t<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which the writer participated, and which were several years since written out, and are here retold at the request of the Banner. The scene I will describe pertains to the evacuation of Richmond and the fifteen days immediately following. The writer was at the time trainmaster of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, and stationed at Danville, Va., the road then running only from Richmond to Danville, there connecting with the Piedmont