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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 49 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 31 31 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1898 AD or search for 1898 AD in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
pping the devil round the stump! ) Many and many a reform had its beginning in one of those quiet Park Street rooms of the N. E. W. C. When I want anything in Boston remedied, said Edward Everett Hale, I go down to the New England Woman's Club! When the General Federation of Women's Clubs was formed in 1892, our mother served on the board of directors for four years, and was then made an honorary vice-president. She was also president of the Massachusetts State Federation from 1893 to 1898, and thereafter honorary president Dr. Holmes once said to her, Mrs. Howe, I consider you eminently clubable ; and he added that he himself was not. He told us why, when he adopted the title of Autocrat of the breakfast-table. The most brilliant of talkers, he did not care to listen, as a good club member must. Now, she too loved talking, but perhaps she loved listening even more. No one who knew her in her later years can forget how intently she listened, how joyously she received info
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 The city of my love She sits among th' eternal hills, Their crown, thrice glorious and dear; Her voice is as a thousand tongues Of silver fountains, gurgling clear. Her breath is prayer, her life is love, And worship of all lovely things; Her children have a gracious port, Her beggars show the blood of kings. By old Tradition guarded close, None doubt the grandeur she has seen; Upon her venerable front Is written: “I was born a Queen!” She rules the age by Beauty's power, As once she ruled by armed might; The Southern sun doth treasure her Deep in his golden heart of light. Awe strikes the traveller when he sees The'vision of her distant dome, And a strange spasm wrings his heart As the guide whispers: “There is Rome!” And, though it seem a childish prayer, I've breathed it oft, that when I die, As thy remembrance dear in it, That heart in thee might buried lie. J. W. H. The closing verse of her early poem, The C
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
g fingers did uphold; within it glowed a wine as red as hearts, not grapes, its drops had shed. drink deep, my Christ, I offer thee the ransom of Humanity. J. W. H. though Jesus, Alas! is as little understood in doctrine as followed in example. For he has hitherto been like a beautiful figure set to point out a certain way, and people at large have been so entranced with worshipping the figure, that they have neglected to follow the direction it indicates. J. W. H. the winter of 1898-99 saw the publication of from Sunset Ridge; poems old and New. this volume contained many of the poems from later Lyrics (long out of print), and also much of her later work. It met with a warm recognition which gave her much pleasure. late in 1899 appeared the reminiscences, on which she had been so long at work. These were even more warmly received, though many people thought them too short. Colonel Higginson said the work might have been spread out into three or four interesting o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
he onward current. Him we trust, And guard we must From schemes to sight abhorrent. When the tuba Called to Cuba Where the fight was raging, Rough and ready Riders led he, Valorous warfare waging. Here's to Teddy! Safe and steady, Loved by every section! South and North Will hurry forth To hasten his election. 1904. On September 12, a notice of the death of William Allen Butler is pasted in the Diary. Below it she writes:-- A pleasant man. I met him at the Hazeltines' in Rome in 1898 and 1899. His poem [Nothing to wear] was claimed by one or two people. I met his father [a Cabinet Minister] at a dinner at the Bancrofts' in New York, at which ex-President Van Buren was also present, and W. M. Thackeray, who said to me across the table that Browning's How they brought the good news was a good jingle. On the 29th she spoke at a meeting of the New England Woman's Club in memory of Dr. Zakrzewska, and records her final words:-- I pray God earnestly that we women may