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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for January 23rd, 1898 AD or search for January 23rd, 1898 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., times, January 23, 1898.] Incidents in the remarkable career of the great soldier. by General Dabney H. Maury. He made a poor impression when he first arrived at West Point—a second in a Duel—he obeyed orders at great cost. Men will never cease to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than with any other great soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the United
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
Hon. Thomas J. Semmes. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, January 23, 1898.] An evening with the venerable statesman and jurist. A charming Retrospect of a useful and eventful life. [Perusal of this will justify its preservation in these pages.—Ed.] To every one at times there comes a moment of retrospection when the mind, leaving the currents of every day life, turns back to the past in loving memory, and thoughts now gay and happy, anon sad and tearful, sweep over the heart chords, and the echoes awakened in some dim twilight hour and heard by only a privileged few, make oft-times an important chapter in history of which the great outside world would gladly catch the lingering refrain. It was the privilege of the writer to share just such a moment as this a few evenings ago in the historic home of the distinguished advocate and jurist, Judge Thomas J. Semmes. For over half a century a conspicuous figure in the United States, for over forty years a leader of