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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coinage, United States (search)
d. Double-eagles $1,538,826,060.00 Eagles 319,061,160.00 Half-eagles259,066,545.00 Three-dollar pieces (coinage discontinued under act of Sept. 26, 1890) 1,619,376.00 Quarter-eagles 29,015,635.00 Dollars (coinage discontinued under act of Sept.26, 1890)19,499,337.00 ————— Total gold$2,167,088,113.00 silver Dollars (coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 10, 1873, and resumed under act of Feb. 28, 1878)*$506,527,453.00 Trade-dollars35,965,924.00 Dollars (Lafayette souvenir), act of March 3, 1899. 50,026.00 Half-dollars 144,988,509.00 Half-dollars (Columbian souvenir)2,501,052.50 Quarter-dollars 63,763,021.50 Quarter-dollars (Columbian souvenir) 10,005.7 Twenty-cent pieces (coinage discontinued, act of May 2, 1878)271,000.00 Dimes35,931,861.20 Half-dimes (coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 12, 1873)4,880,219.40 Three-cent pieces (coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 12, 1873) 1,282,087.20 ————— Total silver $796,171,159.55 minor. Five-cent pieces, n
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCalla, Bowman Hendry 1844- (search)
McCalla, Bowman Hendry 1844- Naval officer; born in Camden, N. J.. June 19, 1844; was appointed a midshipman in the navy, Nov. 30, 1861; was at the Naval Academy Bowman Hendry McCalla. in 1861-64; promoted ensign, Nov. 1, 1866; master, Dec. 1 following; lieutenant, March 12, 1868; lieutenant-commander, March 26, 1869; commander, Nov. 3, 1884; and captain, March 3, 1899. In 1890, while commander of the Enterprise, he was tried by court-martial on five charges, found guilty, and sentenced to suspension for three years and to retain his number on the list of commanders during suspension. During the war with Spain he was in command of the Marblehead, and so distinguished himself, especially by his services in Guantanamo Bay, that the President cancelled the court-martial's sentence of suspension at the request of the Secretary of the Navy, and the written petition of all his classmates. After his promotion to captain he was given command of the protected cruiser Newark, with o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKinley, William 1843- (search)
maritime canal is now more than ever indispensable to that intimate and ready communication between our Eastern and Western seaports demanded by the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands and the expansion of our influence and trade in the Pacific. Our national policy more imperatively than ever calls for its completion and control by this government, and it is believed that the next session of Congress, after receiving the full report of the commission appointed under the act approved March 3, 1899, will make provisions for the sure accomplishment of this great work. Trusts and labor. Combinations of capital which control the market in commodities necessary to the general use of the people, by suppressing natural and ordinary competition, thus enhancing prices to the general consumer, are obnoxious to the common law and the public welfare. They are dangerous conspiracies against the public good and should be made the subject of prohibitory or penal legislation. Publicity wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nichols, Henry E. 1861- (search)
Nichols, Henry E. 1861- Naval officer; born in New York; entered the United States Naval Academy, Oct. 1, 1861; was promoted captain, March 3, 1899. In July, 1898, he joined Admiral Dewey's fleet at Manila. On Jan. 26, 1899, he was transferred to the double-turret monitor Monadnock, and with this vessel performed valuable service in co-operation with the army in the movements north of Manila. From April to June the Monadnock, while lying off Paranaque, was under the fire of the insurgents almost daily. The officers and crew suffered severely from the intense heat. Admiral Dewey offered to send another vessel to Paranaque, but Captain Nichols and his men expressed a desire to remain till the place was captured. On June 10, 1899, while the Monadnock was shelling the insurgent trenches, Captain Nichols was overcome by heat, and died within a few hours.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philip, John Woodward 1840- (search)
Philip, John Woodward 1840- Naval officer; born in New York City, Aug. 26, 1840; entered the navy in 1861; served with distinction during the Civil War and was wounded in the action on Stone River: was on duty in various capacities till placed in command of the battle-ship Texas, Oct. 18, 1897. In the war with Spain he greatly distinguished himself by his conduct in the action at Santiago. His ship, with the Oregon, forced the Almairante Oquendo of the Spanish fleet to run ashore. It was on that occasion that he uttered the memorable words: Don't cheer, boys. The poor devils are dying. At the conclusion of the battle he summoned his men to the quarter-deck, and in their presence thanked God for victory. He was promoted commodore, Aug. 10, 1898, and rear-admiral, March 3, 1899; and at the time of his death, in Brooklyn, N. Y., June 30, 1900, was commandant of the Brooklyn navy-yard.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, George Watson 1841- (search)
Sumner, George Watson 1841- Naval officer; born in Constantine, Mich., Dec. 31, 1841; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1861; promoted lieutenant in August, 1862; participated in the attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in those against the Vicksburg batteries. Later, while commander of the Massasoit, in company with the Onondaga, he protected General Grant's transports from attack by the Confederate iron-clads Fredericksburg and Virginia at City Point, Va. In 1893 he commanded the cruiser Baltimore at the international naval review in New York Harbor. He was promoted rear-admiral March 3, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
except upon his own application, and when the admiral dies the office ceases to exist.] The navy and marine corps reorganized (the navy personnel act)......March 3, 1899 Pan-American Exposition of 1901 authorized......March 3, 1899 The Ohio Centennial and Northwest Territory Exposition at Toledo, O., authorized......MarchMarch 3, 1899 The Ohio Centennial and Northwest Territory Exposition at Toledo, O., authorized......March 3, 1899 Attack on British and American sailors at Samoa, by Mataafa's followers......April 1, 1899 Stephen J. Field, associate justice United States Supreme Court, dies at Washington, D. C.......April 9, 1899 Bronze bust of Thomas Paine unveiled at New Rochelle, N. Y.......May 30, 1899 Statue of President Arthur unveilMarch 3, 1899 Attack on British and American sailors at Samoa, by Mataafa's followers......April 1, 1899 Stephen J. Field, associate justice United States Supreme Court, dies at Washington, D. C.......April 9, 1899 Bronze bust of Thomas Paine unveiled at New Rochelle, N. Y.......May 30, 1899 Statue of President Arthur unveiled in Madison Square, New York......June 14, 1899 First formal meeting of the Venezuela arbitration commission......June 15, 1899 The President calls for ten regiments to quell Philippine insurrection......July 7, 1899 [For an account of the insurrection, and chronology of the main events, see Aguinaldo; Philippines, etc.]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wainwright, Richard 1849- (search)
Wainwright, Richard 1849- Naval officer; born in Washington, D. C., Dec. 17, 1849; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1868; promoted lieutenantcommander, Sept. 16, 1884, and commander, March 3, 1899; was executive officer on Richard Wainwright. the battle-ship Maine when she was destroyed in Havana Harbor in February, 1898; served in the war against Spain as commander of the Gloucester; participated in the destruction of Cervera's fleet, in July, 1898; was appointed superintendent of the United States Naval Academy March 15, 1900. See Santiago, naval battle of. Destruction of Spanish destroyers. The following is Commander Wainwright's report on the destruction of the dreaded Spanish torpedo-boat destroyers Furor and Pluton during the naval battle off Santiago: United States Steamship Gloucester, Off Santiago De Cuba, July 6, 1898. Sir,—I have the honor to report that at the battle of Santiago, on July 3, the officers and crew of the Glouce
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, John Crittenden 1842- (search)
ies and to cooperate with Admiral Cervera. This Spanish fleet for several weeks was variously reported as being at the Cape Verde Islands and at other points near the American seaboard, and at one time it started to go through the Suez Canal and to Manila Bay for the purpose of attacking Dewey's fleet. After the destruction of Cervera's fleet it was reported in the United States that Commodore Watson had received orders to proceed with all haste to the Spanish coast and to begin offensive operations there. This avowed purpose on the part of the United States government, taken in connection with the destruction of Cervera's fleet and the surrender of the Spanish army at Santiago, led the Spanish government to authorize the French ambassador in Washington to make overtures for peace. He was promoted rear-admiral, March 3, 1899; was commander-in-chief of the Asiatic Station from June 15, 1899, to April 19, 1900; and was appointed president of the naval examining board, Oct. 15, 1900.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
Sickness developed in the camp and blues were the order of the day. In December, Wagoner Kiley, of Co. E, died of typhoid fever. His body was sent home and buried with military honors. Private Priggin went home about that time on account of sickness. In February there were more ill than at any time during the term of enlistment. The arrival of new tents, letters from home, which had been delayed, and certain news that they were to be mustered out, were good medicine for invalids. March 3, 1899, one of the Light Guard wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to be, and all are on the mend. On the 31st the 5th was mustered out at Greenville, but the men came home in a body and passed in review before Gov. Wolcott at the State House. Capt. Clark brought back to Medford his whole company, except Sergt. Gray, who was recovering from typhoid fever, and his brother, who stayed behind as nurse and companion. In the state which was the hot-bed of secession, these Massachus