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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Agrippa, Fonteius 1. One of the accusers of Libo, A. D. 16, is again mentioned in A. D. 19, as offering his daughter for a vestal virgin. (Tac. Ann. 2.30, 86.)
t he had maintained the struggle long enough to save his country from subjection, till the jealousy of Tiberius recalled Germanicus, A. D. 17, and left Germany to secure the independence for which her gallant chief had so nobly struggled. The same year that the Romans retired, Arminius was engaged with another enemy in Maroboduus (or Marbod), the king of the Suevi. He was deserted by his uncle, Inguiomer, who was jealous of his glory, and joined his enemy. But he had attached to himself, as the champion of German liberty, the powerful tribes of the Semnones and Longobardi, and a battle was fought in which he was victorious. (Tac. Ann. 2.45.) These successes, however, suggested to him other objects than his country's liberty. Not contented with being the chief of a free tribe, he aimed at absolute power. His countrymen rose in arms against him, and the struggle was undecided when he fell by the hands of his own relations in the 37th year of his age, A. D. 19. (Tac. Ann. 2.88.) [A.G]
ssion till the death of Augustus. He then openly waged war against his nephew, but both parties were commanded by Tiberius to desist from hostilies. Rhescuporis then, feigning a wish for friendly negotiation, invited Cotys to a conference, and, at the banquet which followed, he treacherously seized him, and, having thrown him into chains, wrote to Tiberius, pretending that he had only acted in self-defence and anticipated a plot on the part of Cotys. He was, however, commanded to release him, and to come to Rome to have the matter investigated, whereupon (A. D. 19) he murdered his prisoner, thinking, says Tacitus, that he might as well have to answer for a crime completed as for one half done. Tacitus speaks of Cotys as a mall of gentle disposition and manners, and Ovid, in an epistle addressed to him during his exile at Tomi, alludes to his cultivated taste for literature, and claims his favour and protection as a brother-poet. (Tac. Ann. 2.64-67, 3.38; Vell. 2.129; Ov. ex Pont. 2.9.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
arch, to Pompeiopolis, a maritime town of Cilicia. This he did with the greater pleasure, as it was mortifying to Piso, with whom Vonones was an especial favourite, from his presents and obsequious attention to Plancina. In the following year, A. D. 19, Germanicus visited Egypt, induced by his love of travel and antiquity, and ignorant of the offence which he was giving to Tiberius; for it was one of the arcana of state, established by Augustus, that Egypt was not to be entered by any Roman ofo the infernal deities, were found imbedded in the walls and foundations of his house. Feeling his end approaching, he summoned his friends, and called upon them to avenge his foul murder. Soon after, he breathed his last, on the 9th of October, A. D. 19, in the thirtyfourth year of his age, at Epidaphne near Antiocheia. (Tac. Ann. 2.72, 83; Kal. Antiat. in Orelli, Inscript. vol. ii. p. 401; D. C. 57.18; Seneca, Qu. Nat. 1.1; Zonar. 11.2; J. AJ 18.2, 5; Plin. Nat. 11.37, 71; Suet. Cal. 1.) His c
e ruin of the Marcomannic kingdom. The policy of Maroboduus, ill-understood by his countrymen, appeared to them, or may have really degenerated into despotism. The Cheruscans under Arminius [ARMINIUS] prepared to attack; the Semnones and Longobards, Suevian clans, revolted from him. The jealousy between Arminius and his uncle Inguiomerus [INGUIOMERUS], who embraced the Marcomannic alliance, delayed but could not avert the storm, and Maroboduus, defeated in action, sought the aid of Rome. In A. D. 19 he had again become formidable, and Drtusus prepared to invade him, when Cattualda [CATUALDA], a chief of the Gothones, whom Maroboduus had driven into exile, led a detachment through the Bohemian passes into the heart of Maroboduus's kingdom. As his last resource the Marcomannic king became a suppliant, although a lofty and royal one in his tone, to Tiberius. The emperor assured him of shelter, so long as he needed it, in Italy, and of a free return beyond the Alps when refuge was no longe
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Marsus, Vi'bius whom Tacitus calls (Ann. 6.47) "vetustis honoribus studiisque illustris," is first mentioned in A. D. 19 as one of the most likely persons to obtain the government of Syria, but he gave way to Cn. Sentius. In the same year he was sent to summon Piso to Rome to stand his trial. His name occurs again in A. D. 26, in the debates of the senate; and just before the death of Tiberius (A. D. 37) he narrowly escaped death, being accused as one of the accomplices of Albucilla. In A. D. 47 we find him governor of Syria. (Tac. Ann. 2.74, 79, 4.56, 6.47, 48, 11.10.) The name of C. Vibius Marsus, proconsul, appears on several coins of Utica in Africa, struck in the reign of Tiberius: they probably relate to the same person as the one mentioned above; and as he was disappointed in obtaining the province of Syria in the reign of Tiberius, he may have been appointed to that of Africa. (Eckhel, vol. iv. pp. 147, 148.)
Nero the eldest son of Germanicus and Agrippina, was a youth of about twelve years of age at the death of his father in A. D. 19. In the following year (A. D. 20) he was commended to the favour of the senate by the emperor Tiberius, who went through the form of requesting that body to allow Nero to become a candidate for the quaestorship five years before the legal age. He likewise had the dignity of pontiff conferred upon him, and about the same time was married to Julia, the daughter of Drusus, who was the son of the emperor Tiberius. Nero had been betrothed in the lifetime of his father to the daughter of Silanus (Tac. Ann. 2.43), but it appears that this marriage never took effect. By the death of Drusus, the son of Tiberius, who was poisoned at the instigation of Sejanus in A. D. 23, Nero became the heir to the imperial throne; and as Sejanus had compassed the death of Drusus, in order that he might succeed Tiberius, the same motives led him to plan the death of Nero, as well as
O'ccia a vestal virgin, who died in the reign of Tiberius, A. D. 19, after discharging the duties of her priesthood for the long period of fifty-seven years. (Tac. Ann. 2.58.)
Pacu'vius 5. PACUVIUS, a legate of Sentius in Syria, A. D. 19 (Tac. Ann. 2.79), is probably the same Pacuvius who is mentioned by Seneca (Ep. 2.12).
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Pandus, Lati'nius propraetor of Moesia in the reign of Tiberius, died in his province, A. D. 19. (Tac. Ann. 2.66.)
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