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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 516 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 45 45 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 6 6 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. You can also browse the collection for 1900 AD or search for 1900 AD in all documents.

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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 1: his early years and first employment as a compositor (search)
led a good-sized town. The population of Manhattan Island (below the Harlem River) was only 202,589 in 1830, as compared with the 1,850,093 shown by the census of 1900; the total population of the district now embraced in Greater New York was then only 242,278, while in 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the city, real and personal, in 1833, was only $166,491,542; in 1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part of Manhattan Island, and although, in 1828, lots from two to six miles distant from the City Hall were valued at from only $60 to $700 each, more than one writer of the day was ready to concede that, owing to advantages of cheaper land on the opposite shores of Long Island and New Jersey, newcomers were likely to settle there be
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 9: Greeley's presidential campaign-his death (search)
owell or Lawrence, with a population of at least half a million before the close of this century. Greeley was not a good prophet. The population of Virginia in 1900 was 1,854,184, and of Richmond 85,050. In his autobiography he said, I predict that California will have 3,000,000 of people in 1900 and Oregon at least 1,000,0001900 and Oregon at least 1,000,000. The population of California in 1900 was 1,485,053, and of Oregon 413,536. I exhort you, then, Republicans and Conservatives, whites and blacks, to bury the dead past in mutual and hearty good-will, and in a general, united effort to promote the prosperity and exalt the glory of our long distracted and bleeding, but henceforth 1900 was 1,485,053, and of Oregon 413,536. I exhort you, then, Republicans and Conservatives, whites and blacks, to bury the dead past in mutual and hearty good-will, and in a general, united effort to promote the prosperity and exalt the glory of our long distracted and bleeding, but henceforth reunited, magnificent country. In May, 1871, Greeley accepted an invitation to address the Texas State Fair at Houston, and made a number of speeches in the South on his way to that city. On his return, a public welcome was given to him by his admirers at the Lincoln Club in New York city, on which occasion he made an elabora