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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 131 131 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 6 6 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1901 AD or search for 1901 AD in all documents.

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e. He died on November 18, 1909. moved all discrimination against former Confederate officers, and one of the conspicuous Southern leaders entered the service of the armies against Spain. Newspapers and magazines were filled with expressions of cordiality, such as Joined the Blues and Wheeler at Santiago. This new patriotism was no spasmodic affair of the moment. Political parties were still fervidly debating about imperialism and the colonial policy when the assassination of McKinley, in 1901, startled the whole country. Professor William P. Trent, an acute observer, remarked to me in conversation: I recall vividly how I had to make a flying trip from North to South at the time, and how impressed I was with the fact that not a particle of difference could be noticed between the sections-both were deep in grief. . . . I should say that few events of our time have brought out our essential unity more clearly than his assassination. The justice of Professor Trent's observation is