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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 131 131 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 6 6 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1901 AD or search for 1901 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
General Hood's Brigade. Brave Texans left their native State and achieved Undying fame in Virginia. Address of Don. E. Henderson at Galveston Reunion in 1901. On the occasion of the thirty-first annual reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade at Galveston, Judge Don E. Henderson, of Bryan, a former member of Company E, 5th Texas, Hood's Brigade, made the response to the address of welcome of Major Hume. He spoke as follows: ladies, Gentlemen, and comrades,—The survivors of Hood's Texas Brigade at the behests of the citizens of Galveston have met in annual reunion to do honor to their dead comrades and to the memory of the Lost Cause. A year ago your city was selected for this reunion. Your condition at that time was far different from the present. Then you numbered a population of more than 40,000 souls. This was the beautiful Oleander City; the commercial emporium of Texas; industry stimulated trade and enterprises; faith in the future girdled your loins, and hope smile
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
itish Government in Liverpool, Eng., in November, 1865. In December, 1865, he went to Buenos Ayres, and remained in the Argentine Confederation until 1867, when he returned to his home in Virginia. In 1868 he was appointed captain of one of the Bay Line steamers between Baltimore and Norfolk and Portsmouth. He served in that capacity until 1890, when he resigned to become superintendent of the floating equipment of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Company. After this fleet was sold, in 1901, he assisted, in 1902, in organizing the Virginia Bank and Trust Company, of which he became cashier, and is now a vice president and a director.—W. H. Stewart. From time immemorial one of the most effective and damaging means resorted to in wars between nations and peoples has been an attack upon the commercial marine of an adversary. It was a mode of warfare legitimatized by being resorted to all through the ages. It was adopted by our colonial cruisers during the revolutionary war, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
company of Colonel Humphrey Marshall's First Kentucky Cavalry. He married Tabitha Phelps, of Madison County, but they never had any children. After his death his widow married William Todd, formerly of Missouri, who had been a captain in Quantrell's command. Colonel Chenault was buried on the battlefield at Green River Bridge, but in a few days his remains were taken up by his brother, Dr. R. C. Chenault, and carried to Madison County and reinterred in the old family burying-ground. In 1901, thirty-nine years later, his remains were again exhumed, and reinterred in the Richmond Cemetery. On this occasion the undertaker opened the coffin and found that, owing to some peculiarity of the soil in which it had been buried for nearly forty years, the body was still perfectly preserved, as though death had ensued only the day before, and the features of the face were still as perfect as in life, and plainly recognizable. Colonel Tucker. Joseph T. Tucker was born in Boston, Mass.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.66 (search)
ce the war at Luray, Va. Rector, Wm. F., dead. Rector, Howard, died since the war. Rector, Abner, living near Rectortown, Va. Rector, Columbus, living near Plains, Va. Rector, Asa, living near Rectortown, Va. Rust, H. Clay, died since the war. Rust, John R., living near Ninevah, Va. Robinson, (Bear), lost sight of him; wounded at Brandy Station, 1863. Rogers, Wm. (Wagoner), died in time of the war. Scanlon, Dade, lost sight of him. Skinner, Wm. Jeff., died in 1901. Skinner, Charles, was dreadfully wounded at Buckton; is still living at Rectortown, Va. Stewart, John W., living in Iowa. Sutton, James, died since the war. Silcott, Landon, died since the war. Selix, Tom, killed at Stevensburg in 1863. Smith, Golden H., died since the war. Smith, Seldon, living in Baltimore. Smith, Horace, living near Rectortown, Va. Smith, O'Connel, died during the war. Smith, Granville, killed on the cattle raid (First Lieut.). Smith, Sull