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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 5 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25.. You can also browse the collection for 1903 AD or search for 1903 AD in all documents.

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ew, as search will disclose. Now, for old Medford vistas let us make search. Naturally, we turn first to the published histories, only to be disappointed, as the first is of 1855, and scantily illustrated. The earliest attempt to portray any view or scene in Medford which has come to our knowledge was made (doubtless in 1835) when some one painted a view with the legend, Junction of the River, Canal and Railroad in Medford, 1835. As one said of it in Marblehead, where we first saw it (1903), It is evidently the work of a novice. It conveys the idea expressed but imperfectly, and the novice introduced features so manifestly incongruous as to cause its later owner to endorse on its back (in effect) that the fine houses were a fancy of the artist. Crude as it is, and of no artistic merit, it, however, is the result of a worthy motive, the presentation of a new and important feature in scenic Medford. Who the novice was is unknown, but, in a way, he showed the high embank