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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for February 24th, 1905 AD or search for February 24th, 1905 AD in all documents.

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deep in grief. . . . I should say that few events of our time have brought out our essential unity more clearly than his assassination. The justice of Professor Trent's observation is apparent from a dramatic episode of the next year. When General Charles Francis Adams, a veteran of the Union armies, a New Englander, and the descendant of a long line of distinguished New Englanders, delivered his eulogy on Robert E. Lee, in 1902, it was a sign that extremes had indeed been reconciled. More expressive of popular feeling was an incident almost unnoticed at the time. On February 24, 1905, a bill for returning the Confederate flags was passed in Congress without a single dissenting vote, without even a single moment's debate. This action was the result, not of careful prearrangement, but of spontaneous unanimity among the representatives of an harmonious people. With this impressive proof of the completeness of American union, this record appropriately closes. Dudley H. Miles.
n freedom. Union soldier: on guard over a prisoner in Washington 1865 Confederate officer: of the Washington artillery of New Orleans 1861 Those rebel flags Discussed by one of the Yanks is the author's subtitle. The occasion of the poem was the agitation for the return to the States from whose troops they had been captured of the Confederate battle-flags in the keeping of the war Department at Washington. A bill effecting this was passed without a word of debate on February 24, 1905. for an account of the movement see the Introduction to this volume. Shall we send back the Johnnies their bunting, In token, from Blue to the Gray, That ‘Brothers-in-blood’ and ‘Good Hunting’ Shall be our new watchword to-day? In olden times knights held it knightly To return to brave foemen the sword; Will the Stars and the Stripes gleam less brightly If the old Rebel flags are restored? Call it sentiment, call it misguided To fight to the death for ‘a rag’; Yet, trailed in t