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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 16 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 6 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 4 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 4 4 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 4 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for 1906 AD or search for 1906 AD in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, III: the boy student (search)
at Newport, he and his family came there to live and his children were very anxious to see me, because they had heard so much about their father's guardian. Continuing these notes about his college career, he says:— My greatest peculiarity was an inordinate passion for books—of any sort—great and small, heavy and light, useful or useless, nothing came amiss and I probably accomplished, in the first 13 years of my life, more miscellaneous reading than most youths of eighteen. In 1906, Colonel Higginson wrote on the fly-leaf of one of his old textbooks (Professor Peirce's Elementary Treatise on Curves, Functions, and Forces):— When I left college at graduation in 1841, a few months short of 18, I was the best mathematician in the class, and Prof. Peirce. . . had me placed at once on the examining committee in that department. We studied this book in sheets as it came unbound from the press and I enjoyed it, and used to give my elder brother Waldo (Harvard, 1833) w
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
ty to attend church semi-occasionally, both summer and winter. His family rallied him for sleeping through the sermon, but in such cases it always happened that he had remembered more of the discourse than any of those who criticized him. The 1906 diary records:— Feb. 12. Evening at North End school—very turbulent—Italian boys, but I enjoyed talking to them, until I read from Army Life which was a mistake. Never read before children. Mar. 12. Boston before legislative committce of perhaps 250 in hard storm. June 28. Phi Beta Kappa. At meeting, gave notice of amendment next year in regard to women's admission to dinner. Two grandchildren came to cheer these later days, the first a boy named Wentworth born in 1906, of whom he wrote:— The beautiful and happy baby makes my health or illness a secondary trifle—if I can only pass quietly away without those melancholy intermediate days or weeks when I may be only a burden. And at Ipswich, two years late
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
Bibliography This bibliography, based on a manuscript notebook of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, was originally compiled by the Cambridge Public Library, in 1906, in honor of the author's eighty-third birthday. This list has been revised and brought up to date by Colonel Higginson's private secretary. It does not aim to include all of his writings, but only the more important ones. In the following list the place in parenthesis under the year indicates where Higginson resided during that time. Def. I, II, etc., after a title refers to the volume in the definitive edition (1900) in which that title also appears. Chronological list 1843 (Cambridge) A History. [Poem.] (In Christian Examiner, Nov.) Signed H. Mrs. Child's Letters from New York. (In the Present, Nov. 15.) La Madonna di San Sisto. [Poem.] (In the Present, Dec. 15.) Def. VI. Same. (In Our Book. [A Salem Fair publication.] Sept., 1844.) Same. (In Longfellow. Estray. 1846.) 1845 (Cambridge)