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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Yankee gunboat Smith Briggs. from the Times-dispatch, March 18, 1906, and July 15, 1906. (search)
Yankee gunboat Smith Briggs. from the Times-dispatch, March 18, 1906, and July 15, 1906. Survivor, in search of information, learns how it was captured by Rebels. Some interesting war history, with additional particulars in a letter of Mr. B. A. Sowell. The correspondence below would be interesting merely as an exchange of letters. It is doubly interesting in that it brings out some war history that otherwise might be forever lost. This letter is given just as it was received by the head citizen of the town of Smithfield, Va. Philadelphia, Pa., February 22nd, 1906. To the Mayor or Head Citizen of the Town of Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, Virginia: Dear Sir,—i am Seeking Information on Something occurred Some 42 years ago if you were not then a Resident of the Town Perhaps Some one to whom you Show this Letter Can help you out with the information That i Desire on the first Day of February 1864 i was taken a Prisoner of War in the town of Smithfield along
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The first Confederate Memorial day. From the Times-dispatch, July 15, 1906. (search)
The first Confederate Memorial day. From the Times-dispatch, July 15, 1906. How many of our States claim the first memorial organization? What matters if there are no records to prove it? New Orleans claims it; Georgia claims it; Portsmouth, Va.; Richmond, Va., claim it. But the little village of Warrenton, Va., claims, and can prove it, the first Confederate Memorial Day. Killed in skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, June 1, 1861, Captain John Quincy Marr, Warrenton Rifles, 17th Virginia Regiment, buried in the little village graveyard, June 3rd, with military honors; wept over by the old and young; flowers strewn on his grave, and the first Confederate Memorial Day was observed. After the first battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, the dead and mortally wounded, numbering many, were brought to this same little village, and again memorial day was observed by the women and children. Was this, the women's work, discontinued? No, organized; no, but the spontaneous outburst of th