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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 36: Battle of Ezra Church (search)
ht. I soon learned positively that this terrible assault was made by my old friend and classmate, Lieutenant General Stephen D. Lee, commanding three divisions, while General Stewart's two divisions supported him. Under cover of the darkness General Lee withdrew from my front, after giving us a slight show of life through the firing of his artillery and infantry rear guard. Then he hastened within the protection of the strong forts of Atlanta. 1 General Stephen D. Lee at this writing, 1907, is the Commander of the Society of Confederate Veterans, with his home at Jackson, Miss. He is much esteemed by all who know him. General Lee and I are the last surviving commanders of independent armies in the field during the Civil War. The letter which I wrote that day from the field of battle was as follows: Major General W. T. Sherman, Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi. General: The corps of Hood attacked us to-day at 11.30 A. M. on the right of my line, mainly op
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
ng the thirteen years it is notable that the students have done labor for the institution to the amount of $187,612.52. The number of students enrolled this year (1907) is 1,624. The property, including land, buildings, live stock, and apparatus, is valued at $838,--277.69; the endowment, $1,238,924, and the total assets have reached (1907) $2,227,047.77. The institution named Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute is a success. Its academic and industrial training are going on, hand in hand. One item is full of encouragement: During the college year 1906-7, $8,233 were paid by the students themselves in entrance fees and chapel collections. From Mr7, $8,233 were paid by the students themselves in entrance fees and chapel collections. From Mr. Washington's effort and example, more than a score of kindred smaller schools which did not before exist have been set in motion in Alabama alone. This retrospect affords me great satisfaction. Could the whole school business be set forth in graphic sketches, it would require volumes to contain them. We who labored so hard a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 62: life in Washington, D. C., 1866 to 1874; assigned to duty in regular army as commander, Department of the Columbia (search)
to Portland in August, we found the country not only clear of storms, but very dry and dusty. The city had then about 8,000 people. Nearly all the streets and walks were paved with plank. Since then Portland has been extended in every direction up and down the Willamette River, across to East Portland, and beyond, encroaching upon the great fir forests until there are few left; the city now ascends the hills westward till the extensive wilderness has almost vanished. There are to-day (1907) 100,000 inhabitants within the city limits. Portland has every modern improvement in electric cars, trolley lines, railways passing in and out, and pavements of stone. The new churches, bank buildings, hotels, and splendid houses with beautiful grounds give to Portland, with the Willamette at its feet, a picturesque appearance equal to that of any city of its size in the Union. Of course, the hills still remain, each crowned with a few trees. From any one of these heights the view of t