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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December, 1907 AD or search for December, 1907 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
Seed cover of the Confederacy. From the Jackson clarion-ledger, December, 1907. The famous boy Company of Richmond, commanded by Captain W. W. Parker—the Confederate Women— their encouragement and efforts were behind the movements of the men in the field. In the Great War Between the States, from 1861 to 1865, the Confederate States, because of the great odds in numbers and resources of every kind, including recruits from Europe entering the armies of the Union, had to have in the Confederate armies every musket available in its defense. It was a common remark during the war that the South was robbing the cradle if not the grave, and this was nearer true than is commonly believed, when we consider what is generally recognized as the arms-bearing population of the country, from eighteen to forty or forty-five years of age, even when in extremity the greatest drafts are made to fill the ranks of armies in wars. The Confederate armies had in its ranks many boys from fourteen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of New Market, Va. From the Confederate veteran, Dec., 1907. (search)
The battle of New Market, Va. From the Confederate veteran, Dec., 1907. Account of the famous engagement by the Captain who witnessed It—Took note of the Cadets—Never saw Veterans show greater courage or do better fighting. By D. H. Bruce, of Joppa, Tenn. Having seen a few articles about the battle of New Market, Va., fought in May, 1864, written by those who claim to have seen it, some of which I believe to be erroneous, I give my version as I saw it, believing that history should be correct. As the captain of an infantry company—A, Fifty-first Virginia—I could not see all the field of battle, of course, and can give only part of it. We were stationed about the centre of the line of battle on the left of the pike and some little distance from it. When we got our lines formed after our regiment had run in the rain through a field freshly planted in corn and tramped it into a loblolly of mud, we were on level land in a wheat field, where the growing grain was about knee-