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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 17 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 3 3 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Republic. You can also browse the collection for 1910 AD or search for 1910 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Plato, Republic, Book 2, section 374d (search)
p on that very day a competent combatant in heavy armor or in any other form of warfare—though no other tool will make a man be an artist or an athlete by his taking it in hand, nor will it be of any service to those who have neither acquired the scienceFor the three requisites, science, practice, and natural ability Cf. Unity of Plato's Thought, note 596, and my paper on *FU/SIS, *MELE/TH, *)EPISTH/MH, Tr. A. Ph. A. vol. xl., 1910. of it nor sufficiently practised themselves in its use?” “Great indeed,” he said, “would be the value of tools in that case.Cf. Thucydides ii. 40.““Then,” said I, “in the same degree that the task of our guardiansFirst mention. Cf. 428 D note, 414 B. is the
Plato, Republic, Book 3, section 392a (search)
in our youth great laxityCf. my note in Class. Phil. vol. xii. (1910) p. 308. in turpitude.” “Most assuredly.” “What type of discourse remains for our definition of our prescriptions and proscriptions?” “We have declared the right way of speaking about gods and daemons and heroes and that other world.” “We have.” “Speech, then, about men would be the remainder.” “Obviously.” “It is impossible for us, my friend, to place this here.Or possibly “determine this at present.” The prohibition which it would beg the question to place here is made explicit in Laws 660 E. Cf. Laws 899 D, and 364 B.” “Why?” “Because I presume we are goi
Plato, Republic, Book 3, section 395d (search)
49, 451, and anticipated by Shakespeare's (Cor. III. ii. 123) “By my body's action teach my mind/ A most inherent baseness.” Or have you not observed that imitations, if continued from youth far into life, settle down into habits and (second) natureCf. my paper on *FU/SIS, *MELE/TH, *)EPISTH/MH, T.A.P.A. vol. xl. (1910) pp. 185 ff. in the body, the speech, and the thought?” “Yes, indeed,” said he. “We will not then allow our charges, whom we expect to prove good men, being men, to play the parts of women and imitate a woman young or old wrangling with her husband, defying heaven, loudly boasting, fortunate in her own conceit, or involved in misfortune
Plato, Republic, Book 6, section 492c (search)
BOI( KI/ONES,276 B and D, Shorey on Horace, Odes i.20.7 “datus in theatro cum tibi plausus,” and also the account of the moulding process in Protag. 323-326. In such case how do you think the young man's heart, as the saying is, is moved within him?What would be his plight, his state of mind; how would he feel? Cf. Shorey in Class. Phil. v. (1910) pp. 220-221, Iliad xxiv. 367, Theognis 748KAI\ TI/NA QUMO\N E)/XWN;Symp. 219 D 3TI/NA OI)/ESQE/ ME DIA/NOIAN E)/XEIN; Eurip.I.A. 1173TI/N' E)N DO/MOIS ME KARDI/AN E(/CEIN DOKEI=S; What private teaching do you think will hold out and not rather be swept away by the torrent of censure and applau
Plato, Republic, Book 7, section 528b (search)
ences: Eva Sachs, De Theaeteto Ath. Mathematico,Diss. Berlin, 1914, and Die fünf platonischen Körper(Philolog. Untersuch. Heft 24), Berlin, 1917; E. Hoppe, Mathematik und Astronomie im klass. Altertum, pp. 133 ff.; Rudolf Eberling, Mathematik und Philosophie bei Plato,Münden, 1909, with my review in Class. Phil. v. (1910) p. 114; Seth Demel, Platons Verhältnis zur Mathematik,Leipzig, with my review, Class. Phil. xxiv. (1929) pp. 312-313; and, for further bibliography on Plato and mathematics, Budé, Rep.Introd. pp. lxx-lxxi.” “There are two causes of that,” said I: “first, inasmuch as no city holds them in honor, these inquiries are languidly purs