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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 17 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 3 3 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1910 AD or search for 1910 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

could look back upon service with the armies. There have been members of legislatures by the tens of thousands. War-time portraits of Federal soldiers who contributed to the photographic history half a century later Captain A. W. Greely, 1863; later Maj.-Gen., U. S. A.; chief, signal service (Signals; Telegraph). Private Geo. L. Kilmer in 1864, wearing the Veteran Stripe at 18 (Military editor). Private J. E. Gilman, lost an arm at Gettysburg; commander-in-chief G. A. R. 1910-11 (Grand Army of the Republic). Bvt. Brig.-Gen. T. F. Rodenbough, U. S. A., in 1865; wounded at Trevilian and Winchester; later Secretary, U. S. Military service institution (Cavalry editor). Capt. F. Y. Hedley in 1864, age 20; later editor and author of Marching through Georgia (School of the soldier, Marching and Foraging). Col. W. C. Church; later editor of the Army and Navy Journal and author of life of Ulysses S. Grant (Grant). T. S. C. Lowe, Military Balloonist in the Penin
9362, including about 450 missing. Heavy as were the losses during the year which preceded the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, they were less than the aggregate loss, including missing, of previous commanders of the Army of the Potomac in unsuccessful attempts to accomplish the same result in the same field. Grant's total of killed and wounded was 19,597 less than the average number killed and injured annually by the railroads of the United States during the four years ending 1910. Those who control the destiny of to-morrow are those who are the most apt in learning that, in great matters, it is Before Vicksburg The close-set mouth, squared shoulders and lowering brow in this photograph of Grant, taken in December, 1862, tell the story of the intensity of his purpose while he was advancing upon Vicksburg—only to be foiled by Van Dorn's raid on his line of communications at Holly Springs. His grim expression and determined jaw betokened no respite for the Conf
idence, varying between 25,000 and 50,000 from 1870 to 1880. During the decade between 1880 and 1890 it rose to its highest number of 409,--489. Since then it has decreased, through death, in very great part, until, at the national encampment of 1910, at Atlantic City, it had diminished to 213,901. Its posts exist throughout the length and breadth of the country, and even outside, and nearly every State has a department organization. Its influence is felt in every city, town, and village, annder of the Trans-Mississippi Department from the beginning—their rank being about equal—were made honorary commanders-in-chief for life, and General George W. Gordon, a member of Congress from Tennessee, was chosen as active commander-in-chief in 1910. Generals Gordon, Cabell, and Evans died in. 1911. Each had a military funeral in which U. S. Army officials took part. Within a score of years there had developed a close and cordial cooperation between the veterans and such representative So