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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
eptimius Severus, the latter turned his arms against Pescennius Niger. With regard to Albinus, we must believe that Severus made a provisional arrangement with him, conferring upon him the title of Caesar, and holding with him the consulship in A. D. 194. But after the defeat and death of Niger in A. D. 194, and the complete discomfiture of his adherents, especially after the fall of Byzantium in A. D. 196, Severus resolved to make himself the absolute master of the Roman empire. Albinus seeingA. D. 194, and the complete discomfiture of his adherents, especially after the fall of Byzantium in A. D. 196, Severus resolved to make himself the absolute master of the Roman empire. Albinus seeing the danger of his position, which he had increased by his indolence, prepared for resistance. He narrowly escaped being assassinated by a messenger of Severus (ib. 7, 8), whereupon he put himself at the head of his army, which is said to have consisted of 150,000 men. He met the equal forces of Severus at Lugdunum (Lyons), in Gaul, and there fought with him on the 19th of February, 197 (Spartian. Sever. 11), a bloody battle, in which he was at first victorious, but at last was entirely defeat
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Anuli'nus, P. Cornelius one of the generals of Severus, gained a battle over Niger at Issus, A. D. 194. He afterwards commanded one of the divisions of the army which Severus sent against Adiabene, A. D. 197. He was consul in A. D. 199. (D. C. 74.7, 75.3.)
Nestor (*Ne/stwr). 1. Of Laranda in Lycia according to Suidas, in Lycaonia according to Strabo and Stephanus Byzantinus. He lived in the reign of the emperor Severus, between A. D. 194 and 211. Works He is mentioned by Suidas (s. v.) as an epic poet. We infer from Stephanus Byzantinus (s. v. *)Usta/spai) that he wrote a poem called *)Alecandrei/as, "On the deeds of Alexander," to which Suidas probably refers. Suidas also mentions that he was the father of the poet Peisander. Tryphiodorus, as we learn from Eustathius in the prooemium to the Odyssey, wrote an Odyssey leipogra/mmaton, wanting the letter s throughout. Similarly, Nestor, we learn from Suidas, wrote the Iliad, omitting in each book the letter indicating its number, as in the first book, the letter a, in the second, the letter b, and so on with the rest. He wrote also a poem entitled *Metamorfw/seis. Four fragments of his writings are inserted in the Anthologia Graeca (vol. iii. p. 54, ed. Jacobs). The fourth of these
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
outed and slain. This engagement was followed by a second near Nicaea in Bithynia, in which Pescennius commanded in person with no better fortune; the third encounter, which took place on the gulph of Issus near the Cilician gates, decided the war, for having been defeated after a bloody contest in which no less than 20,000 of his men are said to have fallen, and Antioch having soon after been captured, the pretender fled towards the Euphrates, was overtaken, brought back, and put to death A. D. 194. His wife, his sons, together with his whole family, shared the same fate, and his property was confiscated. His head, fixed upon a pole, was despatched to Byzantium, which still held out against the conqueror, and was exhibited to the besieged as a significant warning of what they might expect should they continue to offer an obstinate resistance. Dio Cassius speaks of Niger as a person not very conspicuous for good or for evil, deserving neither much censure nor much praise. His most m
c. This passage, however, can hardly be fairly said to determine the point, for (as if to show the uncertainty of almost everything relating to Oppian) while Schneider considers that it proves that the poet was born at Corycus, Fabricius and others have adduced it as evidence to show that he was not. Respecting his date there has been equal difference of opinion. Athenaeus says (i. p. 13) he lived shortly before his own time, and Athenaeus flourished, according to Mr. Clinton (Fasti Rom. A. D. 194), about the end of the second century. This testimony may be considered as almost, conclusive with respect to Oppian's date, though it has been attempted to evade it, either by placing Athenaeus more than thirty years later * Fabricius, Schweighaeuser, and others, have first confounded the author of the "lalieutica" with the author of the "Cynegetica," and have then made use of the date of the second Oppian in order to determine the date of Atheneaus. [ATHENAEUS]., or by considering the pa
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
gypt, or along the coast, might gain possession of the great granary of the empire and starve the metropolis. So eagerly did he watch over this department of the public service in after life, that when he died the storehouses of Rome were found to contain a stock of corn sufficient for the consumption of seven years, and as much oil as would have supplied the wants of all Italy for five. The progress of the campaign, which was terminated by the capture of Niger after the battle of Issus, A. D. 194, need not be recapitulated [NIGER, PESCENNIUS]. But Severus was not yet satisfied. Some of the border tribes still refusing to acknowledge his authority, he crossed the Euphrates in the following year (A. D. 195), wasted their lands, captured their cities, forced all whom he encountered to submit, and won for himself the titles of Adiabenicus, Arabicus, and Parthicus. In A. D. 196 Byzantium, after an obstinate resistance, protracted for nearly three years, was taken, to the great joy of th