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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AQUA MARCIA (search)
at the floor of the Anio valley has risen since Roman times, it is impossible to identify them exactly. Nero outraged public opinion by bathing in its springs: but the aqueduct itself seems to have yielded but little to the city in his day, owing to the depredations of private persons (Frontinus cit.; Plin. NH xxxi. 42), and a further restoration was carried out by Titus in 79 A.D. (CIL vi. 1246): there is evidence of repairs by Hadrian; and others were probably made by Septimius Severus in 196 A.D. (CIL vi. 1247); while in 212-3 Caracalla cleared the springs, made some new tunnels, and added another spring, the fons Antoninianus, in connection no doubt with the construction of the branch to his thermae (ib. 1245). The aqua Marcia was joined by the AQUA TEPULA (q.v.) and the AQUA IULIA (q.v.) before the point where it emerged from its underground course, near the sixth mile of the via Latina; and their channels were carried above it on the same arches, and are to be seen in section in
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
e near Porta Septimiana and in Regio I, 532; alters Rostra, 453; Schola Xanthi restored, 468; builds new Castra Equitum Singularium, 105; Balneae (?), 70; strengthens aqueduct of Nero, 41: Septem Domus Parthorum, 187: so-called Domus Gelotiana under Palatine, 162: house of Clemens, 177; Julia Domna restores House of Vestals, 60, and Temple of Vesta, 558; alterations in the barracks of first Cohort of Vigiles, 129. 196Repairs to Aqua Marcia, 25. 197Domus Lateranorum, 183. 197-198Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 202Pantheon restored, 383. 203Porticus of Octavia restored after a fire, 427. Arch of Severus in Forum, 43. (ca.). Domus Cilonis, 176. 204Arch of Severus in the Forum Boarium, 44. 209-211Restorations to Pompey's Theatre, 517. 211-217Reign of Caracalla: he constructs Via Nova, 565; builds Aqua Antoniniana, 26, 32: Pons Aurelius (?), 399; enlarges ianuae of Circus Ma
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
and Gaul. Julianus having been put to death by order of the senate, who dreaded the power of Septimius Severus, the latter turned his arms against Pescennius Niger. With regard to Albinus, we must believe that Severus made a provisional arrangement with him, conferring upon him the title of Caesar, and holding with him the consulship in A. D. 194. But after the defeat and death of Niger in A. D. 194, and the complete discomfiture of his adherents, especially after the fall of Byzantium in A. D. 196, Severus resolved to make himself the absolute master of the Roman empire. Albinus seeing the danger of his position, which he had increased by his indolence, prepared for resistance. He narrowly escaped being assassinated by a messenger of Severus (ib. 7, 8), whereupon he put himself at the head of his army, which is said to have consisted of 150,000 men. He met the equal forces of Severus at Lugdunum (Lyons), in Gaul, and there fought with him on the 19th of February, 197 (Spartian. Seve
ius; the allusions to his son (1.66. 78, 2.683, 4.5, 5.45) will refer to Commodus; and the poem may be supposed to have been written after A. D. 177, which is the year when the latter was admitted to a participation of the imperial dignity. If the writer of the "Halieutica" be supposed to have lived under Caracalla, the name "Antoninus" will certainly suit that emperor perfectly well, as the appellation "Aurelius Antoninus" was conferred upon him when he was appointed Caesar by his father, A. D. 196. (Clinton's Fasti Rom.) But if we examine the other passages above referred to, the difficulty of applying theme to Caracalla will be at once apparent, as that emperor (as far as we learn from history) had no son, --though some persons have even gone so far as to conjecture that he must have had one, because Oppian alludes to hint ! (Schneider's first ed. p. 346.) The "Halieutica" consist of about 3500 hexameter lines, divided into five books, of which the first two treat of the natural
h Herodian and lamblichus the Syrian [IAMBLICHUS, No. 1], as a pleasant writer of amatory tales, whose works tended to allure the mind to the pursuit of pleasure. All his works appear to be lost. (Suidas ll. cc. ; Theodor. Priscian. l.c.; Fabric. BBL. Graec. vol. viii. pp. 159, 160; Vossius, De Hist. Graec. lib. iii.) Philippus 3. APOSTOLUS. [No. 11.] Philippus 4. CAESARIENSIS SYNODI RELATOR. Works account of the council of Caesareia The account of the council of Caesareia, held A. D. 196, which (if indeed it be genuine) was written by Theophilus of Caesareia, who lived about that time [THEOPHILUS], was published by the Jesuit Bucherius, as the work of one Philippus; the editor being apparently misled by an error in the MS. used by him. Editions The Jesuit Bucherius published this work in his notes to the Canon Paschalis of Victories of Aquitania, fol. Antwerp, 1634. Further Information Fabric. Bibl. Gracec. vol. vii. p. 107; Cave, Hist. Litt. ad ann. 192, vol. i. p.
Philippus 4. CAESARIENSIS SYNODI RELATOR. Works account of the council of Caesareia The account of the council of Caesareia, held A. D. 196, which (if indeed it be genuine) was written by Theophilus of Caesareia, who lived about that time [THEOPHILUS], was published by the Jesuit Bucherius, as the work of one Philippus; the editor being apparently misled by an error in the MS. used by him. Editions The Jesuit Bucherius published this work in his notes to the Canon Paschalis of Victories of Aquitania, fol. Antwerp, 1634. Further Information Fabric. Bibl. Gracec. vol. vii. p. 107; Cave, Hist. Litt. ad ann. 192, vol. i. p. 87, ed. Oxford, 1740-1743.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Priscus, M. Treba'tius consul suffectus in A. D. 109. (Fasti.) PRISCUS, L. VALE'RIUS MESSA'LA THRA'SEA, was distinguished alike by his birth and wisdom during the reign of Septimius Severus. He was consul in A. D. 196, and about seventeen years afterwards fell a victim to the cruelty of Caracalla. (D. C. 77.5.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
five. The progress of the campaign, which was terminated by the capture of Niger after the battle of Issus, A. D. 194, need not be recapitulated [NIGER, PESCENNIUS]. But Severus was not yet satisfied. Some of the border tribes still refusing to acknowledge his authority, he crossed the Euphrates in the following year (A. D. 195), wasted their lands, captured their cities, forced all whom he encountered to submit, and won for himself the titles of Adiabenicus, Arabicus, and Parthicus. In A. D. 196 Byzantium, after an obstinate resistance, protracted for nearly three years, was taken, to the great joy of the emperor, who treated the vanquished with little moderation. Its famous walls were levelled with the earth, its soldiers and magistrates were put to death, the property of the citizens was confiscated, and the town itself, deprived of all its political privileges, made over to the Perinthians. Meanwhile Clodius Albinus, who, although created Caesar, found that after the destructio
s attacks were the most harmless and most loyal adherents of the emperor -- dangerous, because God had already on many occasions manifested his wrath by punishing in this world those who persecuted his people. In the last section he particularly alludes to a portentous darkening of the sun, which took place during a public assembly at Utica, and this is by some commentators believed to have been the great eclipse of A. D. 210. The capture of Byzantium also is spoken of, which took place in A. D. 196. 24. De Spectaculis. Preparations on a great scale were in progress at Carthage for celebrating with all pomp certain public games. This tract is a solemn denunciation, addressed to all true believers, against taking any part in such exhibitions, which were invented by devils, and were calculated to awaken and cherish feelings and passions altogether inconsistent with the Christian profession. Neander supposes that this and the following piece were called forth by the rejoicings at the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
P. Thra'sea Paetus * The gentile name of Thrasea is not mentioned by any ancient writer, and has given rise to some dispute. Lipsius (ad Tac. Ann. 16.21) suspected that it might be Valerius, because we find in an inscription, a L. Valerius Messalla Thrasea, who was consul in A. D. 196, but we have no evidence that this person was a descendant of Thrasea Paetus, and the name of Thrasea occurs in other gentes. It has been conjectured, with more probability, by Haase (ia Ersch and Gruber's Encyklop├Ądie, art. P├Ątus), that Fannins was the gentile name of our Thrasea, since his daughter was called Fannia, and not Arria, like her mother and grandmother., one of those distinguished Romans in the reign of Nero who were disgusted with the tyranny and corruption of the times in which they lived, and endeavored to carry into practice the severer virtues of the Stoic philosophy. He was a native of Patavium (Padua), and was probably born soon after the death of Augustus. Nothing is related of his
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