hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for 1973 AD or search for 1973 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
le and Stuart's at Gettysburg. Our most serious loss in connection with it had been the death of our brilliant cavalry leader, Maj.-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, who was killed at Yellow Tavern, near Richmond, on May 11. As before said, I have always believed that Lee should have made him the successor of Stonewall Jackson when the latter was killed at Chancellorsville. Grant's total casualties in the North Anna lines, May 23 to 27, are given as: — Killed 22, wounded 1460, missing 290, total 1973. The Confederate losses were probably about the same. On the 26th, Grant, at noon, started Sheridan and the pontoon trains to cross the Pamunkey River at Hanover Town. After dark the infantry moved, and by next morning his whole army had vanished, except cavalry pickets at the sites where the bridges had stood. The movement of the enemy was not discovered until the morning of the 27th. The rough sketch map represents the essentials of the position. Map. The army was put in m