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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Phraates IV. (search)
t. Aug, 21; Hor. Ep. 1.18. 56, Carm. 4.15. 6; Ovid, Ov. Tr. 2.1. 228, Fast. 6.467, Ar. Am. 1.179, &c.; Propert. 2.10, 3.4, 3.5. 49, 4.6.79; Eckhel, vi. pp. 94-97.) Phraates also sent to Augustus as hostages his four sons, with their wives and children, who were carried to Rome. According to some accounts he delivered them up to Augustus, not through fear of the Roman power, but lest the Parthians should appoint any of them king in his stead, or according to others, through the influence of his Italian wife, Thennusa, by whom he had a fifth son, Phraataces. (Tac. Ann. 2.1; J. AJ 18.2.4; Strab. xvi. p.748.) In A. D. 2, Phraates took possession of Armenia, and expelled Artavasdes, who had been appointed king by Augustus, but was compelled soon after to give it up again. (D. C. 55.11; Vell. 2.101; Tac. Ann. 2.4.) He was shortly afterwards poisoned by his wife Thermusa, and his son Phraataces. (Joseph. l.c.) The coin given under Arsaces XIV. is assigned by most modern writers to this king.
. As Ariobarzanes was a man of great talents and distinguished by bodily beauty, a quality which the eastern nations have always liked to see in their kings, the Armenians applauded the choice of Augustus. He died suddenly after a short reign in A. D. 2, according to the chronology of St. Martin. He left male issue, but the Armenians disliked his children, and chose Erato their queen. She was, perhaps, the widow of Tigranes III. (Tac. Ann. 3.4.) Vonones Erato was deposed by the Armenians aft.--B. C. 36. Artavasdes or Artawazt I., his son.--B. C. 30. Artaxes II., his son.--B. C. 20. Tigranes II., brother of Artaxes II.--B. C. .... Tigranes III.--B. C. 6. Artavasdes II.--B. C. 5. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Po
Ariobarzanes After Artavasdes II. and Tigranes III. had been driven out by the Romans, the choice of Augustus for a king of the Armenians fell upon one Ariobarzanes, a Median or Parthian prince, who seems not to have belonged to the dynasty of the Arsacidae. As Ariobarzanes was a man of great talents and distinguished by bodily beauty, a quality which the eastern nations have always liked to see in their kings, the Armenians applauded the choice of Augustus. He died suddenly after a short reign in A. D. 2, according to the chronology of St. Martin. He left male issue, but the Armenians disliked his children, and chose Erato their queen. She was, perhaps, the widow of Tigranes III. (Tac. Ann. 3.4.)
his time Phraates IV., king of Parthia, seized upon Armenia, and Caius accordingly prepared to make war against him, but the Parthian king gave up Armenia, and settled the terms of peace at an interview with Caius on an island in the Euphrates. (A. D. 2.) After this Caius went to take possession of Armenia, but was treacherously wounded before the town of Artagera in this country. Of this wound he never recovered, and died some time afterwards at Limyra in Lycia, on the 21st of February, A. D. 4. His brother Lucius had died eighteen months previously, on August 20th, A. D. 2, at Massilia, on his way to Spain. Their bodies were brought to Rome. Some suspected that their death was occasioned by their step-mother Livia. (D. C. 54.8, 18, 26, 4.6, 9, 11, 12; Zonar. x. p. 539 ; Suet. Aug. 26, 56, 64, 65, Tib. 12; Vell. 2.101, 102; Tac. Ann. 1.3, 2.4; Florus, 4.12.42; Lapis Ancyranus.) C. Caesar married Livia or Livilla, the daughter of Antonia [ANTONIA, No. 6], who afterwards married the
Censori'nus 6. C. Marcius Censorinus, L. F. L. N., son of No. 5, was consul in B. C. 8 (D. C. 55.5; Plin. Nat. 33.10. s. 47; Censorin. 22; Sueton. Vit. Horat.; Lapis Ancyranus), and seems to have obtained subsequently the government of Syria, from the way in which he is mentioned by Josephus (J. AJ 16.6.2) in the decree of Augustus securing certain immunities to the Jews. He died in Asia in A. D. 2, when he was in attendance upon C. Caesar, the grandson of Augustus. His death was universally regretted: Velleius Paterculus calls him (2.102) " Vir demerendis hominibus genitus." There are several interesting coins of the Marcia gens, bearing upon them the names of C. Censorinus and L. Censorinus; but it is impossible to determine to which of the preceding Censorini they belong. Five specimens of these coins are given below. The first three contain on the obverse the heads of Numa Pompilius and Ancus Marcius, the second and fourth kings of Rome, because the Marcia gens claimed to be
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
he name Aurelius simply. The name Charisius was not uncommon in the decline of the empire, and, when it occurs on coins, it is usually spelled Carisius, as if it were etymologically connected with Carus rather than xa/ris. The jurist, according to Panziroli (de Clar. Jur. Interpp. pp. 13, 59), was the same with the Arcadius to whom Carus, Carinus, and Numerianus directed a rescript, A. D. 283. (Cod. 9. tit. 11. s. 4.) There is a constitution of Diocletianus and Maximianus, addressed, A. D. 300-2, to Arcadius Chresimus. (Cod. 2. tit. 3. s. 27.) Panziroli would here read Charisius for Chresimus, and would also identify our Charisius with the Carisius (Vat. M. S.; vulg. lect. Charissimus), praeses of Syria, to whom was addressed (A. D. 290) an earlier constitution of the same emperors. (Cod. 9. tit. 41. s. 9.) These identifications, however, though not absolutely impossible, rest upon mere conjecture, and would require the jurist to have lived to a very advanced age. Three works of Char
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
writing, and practising, that he was actually afraid of being poisoned by them. (De Praenot. ad Epig. 100.4. vol. xiv. p. 623, &c.) A full account of his first visit to Rome * Some persons think that Galen's first visit to Rome took place A. D. 161-2, and that therefore he was there twice before his visit A. D. 170; but Galen himself never speaks of this as his third visit, and the writer is inclined to think that all the passages in his works that seem to imply that he was at Rome A. D. 161-2,2, may be easily reconciled with the other hypothesis., and of some of his most remarkable cures, is given in the early chapters of his work De Praenotione ad Epigenem, where he mentions that he was at last called, not only paradocolo/gos, " the wonder speaker," but also paradocopoio/s, " the wonder-worker." (100.8. p. 641.) It is often stated that Galen fled from Rome in order to avoid the danger of a very severe pestilence, which had first broken out in the parts about Antioch,A. D. 166, and, a
s, because he had been preferred to her sons as the husband of Julia, the daughter of Augustus. (D. C. 53.33.) But for this there seems little ground. The opportune death both of C. Caesar and L. Caesar seems much more suspicious. These young men were the children of Julia by her marriage with Agrippa; and being the grandchildren of Augustus, they presented, as long as they lived, an insuperable obstacle to the accession of Tiberius, the son of Livia. But Lucius died suddenly at Massilia in A. D. 2, and Caius in Lycia A. D. 4, of a wound, which was not considered at all dangerous. It was generally suspected that they had both been poisoned, by the secret orders of Livia and Tiberius. She was even suspected of having hastened the death of Augustus in A. D. 14. Augustus left Livia and Tiberius as his heirs ; and by his testament adopted her into the Julia gens, in consequence of which she received the name of Julia Augusta. By the accession of her son to the imperial throne, Livia had
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
C. Cassius Longinus under the Lex Pedia, on account of the latter being one of Caesai's murderers. The family of Paterculus, therefore, seems to have been one of wealth, respectability, and influence. Velleius Paterculus was probably born about B. C. 19, the year in which Virgil died. He adopted the profession of arms; and, soon after he had entered the army, he accompanied C. Caesar in his expedition to the East, and was present with the latter at his interview with the Parthian king, in A. D. 2. Two years afterwards, A. D. 4, he served under Tiberius in Germany, succeeding his father in the rank of Praefectus Equitum, having previously filled in succession the offices of tribune of the soldiers and tribune of the camp. For the next eight years Paterculus served under Tiberius, either as praefectus or legatus, in the various campaigns of the latter in Germany, Pannonia, and Dalmatia, and, by his activity and ability, gained the favour of the future emperor. He was accordingly promo
tony to crush him; and, accordingly, on the advice of Maecenas, he married Scribonia, in order to gain the favour of Pompey, and of his father-in-law Libo. Scribonia was much older than Octavian, and he never had any affection for her ; and, accordingly, he did not hesitate to divorce her in the following year, B. C. 39, on the very day in which she had borne him a daughter, Julia, in order to marry Livia, more especially as he was now on good terms with Antony, and hoped to drive Pompey out of Sicily. Octavian said that lie divorced her on account of her loose morals ; but Antony maintained that it was because she had taken offence at her husband's intercourse with Livia : the real reason, however, was undoubtedly his love of Livia. Scribonia long survived her separation from Octavian, for in A. D. 2 she accompanied, of her own accord, her daughter Julia into exile, to the island of Pandateria. (Suet. Aug. 62, 69; Appian, App. BC 5.53; D. C. 48.34, 4.10; Vell. 2.100; Tac. Ann. 2.27.)
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