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Avi'ola 2. Acilius Aviola, legate of Gallia Lugdunensis under Tiberius, put down an outbreak of the Andecavi and Turonii, in A. D. 21. (Tac. Ann. 3.41.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Blandus, Rube'llius whose grandfather was only a Roman knight of Tibur, married in A. D. 33 Julia, the daughter of Drusus, the son of the emperor Tiberius, whence Blandus is called the progener of Tiberius. (Tac. Ann. 6.27, 45.) Rubellius Plautus, who was put to death by Nero, was the offspring of this marriage. [PLAUTUS.] There was in the senate in A. D. 21 a Rubellius Blandus, a man of consular rank (Tac. Ann. 3.23, 51), who is probably the same as the husband of Julia, though Lipsius supposes him to be the father of the latter. We do not, however, find in the Fasti any consul of this name. There is a coin, struck under Augustus, bearing the inscription C. RVBELLIVS BLANDVS HIVIR A. A. A. F. F., that is, Auro Argento Aeri Flando Ferinndo, which is probably to be referred to the father of the above-mentioned Blandus. (Eckhel, v. p. 295.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Caecilia'nus, Ma'gius praetor, falsely accused of treason in A. D. 21, was acquitted, and his accusers punished. (Tac. Ann. 3.37.)
s a causeway known by the name of the Long Bridges. Here his army was attacked and nearly destroyed by Arminius; but he eventually defeated the Germans with great slaughter, and reached the Rhine in safety. [ARMINIUS.] On account of this victory, he received the insignia of a triumph. (Tac. Ann. 1.31, 32, 56, 60, 63-68, 72.) This is the last military command which Caecina appears to have held. He is mentioned in A. D. 20 as the author of a proposition in the senate that an altar should be erected to the goddess of Vengeance, on account of the suppression of Piso's conspiracy; and again in A. D. 21, as proposing that the governors of provinces should not be allowed to take their wives with them into their provinces. Tacitus gives a speech of his on the latter of these motions, in which he states, that he had always lived in harmony with his wife, who had borne him six children. His motion, which was opposed by Valerius Messallinus and Drusus, was not carried. (Tac. Ann. 3.18, 33, 34.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cursor, Cae'lius a Roman eques in the time of Tiberius, who was put to death by the emperor, in A. D. 21, for having falsely charged the praetor Magius Caecilianus with high treason. (Tac. Ann. 3.37.) [L.S]
ropensities, obtained the nickname of Castor. (D. C. 57.14.) In the following year Tiberius sent him to Illyricum, not only to teach him the art of war, and to make him popular with the soldiery, but to remove him from the dissipations of the city. It is not easy to determine the exact scene of his operations, but he succeeded in fomenting dissension among the Germanic tribes, and destroyed the power of Maroboduus. For these successes an ovation was decreed to him by the senate. In the year A. D. 21, he was consul a second time, and the emperor was his colleague. In A. D. 22, he was promoted to the still higher dignity of the " tribunicia potestas," a title devised by Augustus to avoid the obloquy attending the name of king or dictator. By this title subsequent emperors counted the years of their reign upon their coins. It rendered the power of intercession and the sacrosanct character of tribunus plebis compatible with patrician birth. To confer it upon Drusus was clearly to point him
Fenestella a Roman historian, of considerable celebrity, who flourished during the reign of Augustus, and died, according to the Eusebian Chronicle, A. D. 21, in the 70th year of his age. Works Annales His great work, entitled Annales, frequently quoted by Asconius, Pliny, A. Gellius, and others, extended to at least twenty-two books, as appears from a reference in Nonius, and seems to have contained very minute, but not always perfectly accurate, information with regard to the internal affairs of the city. The few fragments preserved relate almost exclusively to events subsequent to the Carthaginian wars; but whether the narrative reached from the foundation of Rome to the down-fall of the republic, or comprehended only a portion of that space, we have no means of determining. We are certain, however, that it embraced the greater part of Cicero's career. Other Possible Works Epitomae In addition to the Annales, we find a citation in Diomedes from Fenestellam in libro Epitom
alue, as this writer always speaks favourably of the friends of Augustus, are confirmed by the weightier authority of Tacitus, who bears the strongest testimony to the virtues and wisdom of Lepidus. (Tac. Ann. 4.20.) The name of M. Lepidus occurs several times in Tacitus, and must be carefully distinguished from that of M'. Lepidus [see No. 25], with which it is frequently confounded, both in the MSS. and editions of the historian. M. Lepidus is first mentioned in Tacitus at the accession of Tiberius, A. D. 14, next in A. D. 21, when he declined the proconsulate of Africa, and also in the debate in the senate in the same year respecting the punishment of C. Lutorius Priscus; again in A. D. 24; then in A. D. 26, when he was appointed governor of the province of Asia; and lastly in A. D. 33, which was the year of his death. (Tac. Ann. 1.13, 3.35, 50, 4.20, 56, 6.27.) It was this M. Lepidus who repaired the Aemilia Basilica in A. D. 22 (Tac. Ann. 3.72), as is mentioned above. [No. 16.]
us, Q. F., the son apparently of No. 21, was consul with T. Statilius Taurus in A. D. 11. (D. C. 56.25.) He must be carefully distinguished from his contemporary M. Aemilius Lepidus, with whom he is frequently confounded. [See No. 23.] Though we cannot trace the descent of this M'. Lepidus [see No. 21], yet among his ancestors on the female side were L. Sulla and Cn. Pompey. (Tac. Ann. 3.22.) It is perhaps this M'. Lepidus who defended Piso in A. D. 20; and it was undoubtedly this Lepidus who defended his sister later in the same year. [LEPIDA, No. 2.] In A. D. 21 he obtained the province of Asia, but Sex. Pompey declared in the senate that Lepidus ought to be deprived of it, because he was indolent, poor, and a disgrace to his ancestors, but the senate would not listen to Pompey, maintaining that Lepidus was of an easy rather than a slothful character, and that the manner in which he had lived on his small patrimony was to his honour rather than his disgrace. (Tac. Ann. 3.11, 22, 32.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
t in the triumphal procession of Tiberius, and were decorated with military honours. Two years afterwards, A. D. 14, the names of Velfices leius and his brother were put down by Augustus for the praetorship; but as that emperor died before the comitia were held, they were elected to this dignity at the commencement of the reign of Tiberius. We have no further particulars of the life of Paterculus, for there is no reason to believe that the P. Velleius or Vellaeus mentioned by Tacitus under A. D. 21 (Ann. 3.39) is the same as the historian. Paterculus was alive in A. D. 30, as he drew up his history in that year for the use of M. Vinicius, who was then consul; and it is conjectured by Dodwell, not without probability, that he perished in the following year (A. D. 31), along with the other friends of Sejanus. The favourable manner in which he had so recently spoken in his history of this powerful minister would be sufficient to ensure his condemnation on the fall of the latter. Works
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