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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 230 AD or search for 230 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, DIRIBITORIUM (search)
DIRIBITORIUM a building in the campus Martius in which the votes cast by the people, presumably in the Saepta, were counted by the diribitores, or election officials. It was begun by Agrippa, but opened and finished by Augustus in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8). Its roof had the widest span of any building erected in Rome before 230 A.D., and was supported by beams of larch one hundred feet long and one and a half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of grea
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SOL, TEMPLUM (search)
with a portico, a broad shallow hall on its west side, and three rectangular cellae behind it. They note that the architectural detail is very similar to that of the Hadrianeum. If we accept this view, the temple of Sol lay north of the campus Agrippae. Here, on the east side of the Corso between the Via S. Claudio and the Via Frattina, have been found tufa and peperino walls, granite columns and other architectural remains It has recently been asserted that they cannot be later than about 230 A.D. (Zeitschr. f. Gesch. d. Archit. viii. (1924), 73). (for those found under the church of S. Silvestro in Capite, see PT 62), and a drawing of Palladio, of the sixteenth century (BC 1894, pls. xii.-xiv.), represents a building on this site which consists of two adjacent enclosures running north and south. One of these has apsidal ends and is 90.50 metres long and 42.70 wide; the other is rectangular and 126 metres long and 86.38 wide. These enclosures occupy the space from the Piazza S. Si
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VICUS SABUCI (search)
VICUS SABUCI * a street in Region III, known only from one inscription (CIL vi. 8o1) that was found in the via Merulana near S. Martino ai Monti. The form Sabucus (for Sambucus, the elder-tree) is also found in Serenus Sammonicus (fl. A.D. 230 (?) ).