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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 237 AD or search for 237 AD in all documents.

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ign, which is extremely obscure, in consequence of the ignorance and carelessness of our ancient authorities, has been elucidated with great skill by Eckhel, whose arguments, founded chiefly upon the evidence afforded by medals, appear quite irresistible. From these it appears certain that the death of Alexander Severus happened not later than the beginning of July, A. D. 235; that Maximinus betook himself to Sirmium, after his successful campaign against the Germans, towards the close of A. D. 237; that the elevation of the Gordians in Africa took place about the commencement of March, A. D. 238, and their death about six weeks afterwards; that Maximinus set out upon his march for Rome early in April, sat down before Aquileia towards the end of the month, and was slain, in all probability about the middle of May. The names C. Julius Verus, together with the titles Dacicus Maximus and Sarmaticus Maximus, appear in inscriptions only; medals at first exhibit the simple Maximinus, to
Ovi'iNIUS 4. L. Ovinius Rusticus Cornelianus, consul A. D. 237, with P. Titius Perpetuus (Fasti). O'VIUS, a contemporary of Cicero mentioned by him in B. C. 44 (ad Att. 16.1.5).
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Perpe'tuus, P. Titius consul A. D. 237 with L. Ovinius Rusticus Cornelianus.
f u(/patos, but Gordian, who in A. D. 239 was only in his 14th year, was too young to have had any such conversation as that referred to. (Fast. Rom. p. 255.) It may have been one of the other Gordiani, who were conspicuous for their consulships. (Jul. Capitol. Gordian. 100.4.) As they were slain A. D. 238, the lives must have been written prior to this event. And as Aspasius did not settle in Rome till A. D. 235 (Clinton, F. R. p. 245) the lives of the sophists were probably written about A. D. 237. Before proceeding to particularize those of his works which have come down to us, it may be more convenient to speak of their general object and style. In all of them, except the lives of the sophists, Philostratus seems to have intended to illustrate the peculiar manner in which the teachers of rhetoric were in the habit of treating the various subjects that came before them. They amplified, ornamented, and imitated without regard to historical truth, but solely as a species of gymnas
f u(/patos, but Gordian, who in A. D. 239 was only in his 14th year, was too young to have had any such conversation as that referred to. (Fast. Rom. p. 255.) It may have been one of the other Gordiani, who were conspicuous for their consulships. (Jul. Capitol. Gordian. 100.4.) As they were slain A. D. 238, the lives must have been written prior to this event. And as Aspasius did not settle in Rome till A. D. 235 (Clinton, F. R. p. 245) the lives of the sophists were probably written about A. D. 237. Before proceeding to particularize those of his works which have come down to us, it may be more convenient to speak of their general object and style. In all of them, except the lives of the sophists, Philostratus seems to have intended to illustrate the peculiar manner in which the teachers of rhetoric were in the habit of treating the various subjects that came before them. They amplified, ornamented, and imitated without regard to historical truth, but solely as a species of gymnas
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sila'nus, Ju'nius 18. Junius Silanus, consul suffectus under Maximinus in A. D. 237 (Fasti). There are several coins of the Junia Gens with the name of Silanus upon them. We annex two specimens. On the obverse of the first is the head of Salus, and on the obverse of the second the head of a barbarian with a torquis round the coin. The torquis was inserted in order to mark the connection of the Silani with the Manlii Torquati. We have already seen that the son of the jurist T. Manlius Torquatus was adopted by a D. Junius Silanus. [See above, No. 3.] In consequence of this connection between the Silani and Torquati, we find the name of Torquatus assumed by several of the Silani. [See above, Nos. 14, 15.] Who the D. Silanus is, referred to on these coins, cannot be determined; the two coins probably refer to two different persons of the name.
Valeria'nus Roman emperor, A. D. 253-260. P. Licinius Valerianus, whose father's name was Valerius, traced his descent from an ancient and noble stock. After passing through various grades in the service of the state, he had risen to the highest honours at least as early as A. D. 237, for we find him styled a consular when despatched a year later by the Gordians to Rome. Decius having determined to revive the censorship, and having called upon the senate to name the individual most worthy of such an office, demanding the union of the most spotless integrity with the most sound discretion, the whole assembly with one voice fixed upon Valerian eagerly, extolling his accomplishments and worth. This singular unanimity, and the tone of hyperbolical compliment in which the choice was announced, must be received either as a proof of the surpassing merit of the personage thus distinguished, or as an indication that the emperor, although he ostensibly left the election open, had contrived bef