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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 240 AD or search for 240 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AVENTINUS MONS (search)
e. The latter figure is too small even for the western part, and must be considered as an error; the-former corresponds quite closely to that area enclosed within the line of the Servian wall on both hills, and evidently refers to that. In strictly official language Aventinus may always have remained the designation of the western half only. A fragment of the Acta Arvalia recently found (NS 1914, 473; BC 1914, 37; DAP 2. xii. 37; BCr 1915, 66: in clivo capsar(io) in Aventino maior(i) ), of 240 A.D., indicates clearly that then at any rate Aventinus maior, the main part of the hill, was distinguished from Aventinus minor, the part now called the pseudo-Aventine. When names were given to the Augustan divisions of the city, the thirteenth was called Aventinus; while the twelfth, comprising the eastern part of the hill, was the Piscina Publica (for a full discussion of this question, see Merlin, L'Aventin dans l'Antiquite, Paris 1906, 5-14, and literature there cited; HJ 149-157). Accordi
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CLIVUS CAPSARIUS (search)
CLIVUS CAPSARIUS a street on the Aventine known only from a fragment of the Acta Arvalia of 240 A.D. (NS 1914, 473-474; DAP 2. xii. 37: in domu Fab. Fortunati promag. q.e. in clivo Capsar. in Aventino maiore). The capsarii looked after the clothes of persons using the public baths (CIL vi. 9232: capsararius de Antonianas (thermas)), and the clivus may have received its name because the attendants of the clothes rooms of the baths of Caracalla lived in it (cf. DE ii. 101).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FABIUS FORTUNATUS, DOMUS (search)
FABIUS FORTUNATUS, DOMUS a house on the CLIVUS CAPSARIUS (q.v.) in Aventino Maiore. It is mentioned only in a fragment of the Acta Arvalia of 240 A.D. (NS 1914, 473-474).