hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AUGUSTUS, DIVUS, TEMPLUM (search)
s Pius, which would of course show the portico added to the building by Hadrian (AJA 1924, 397). And if the front hall cannot be the temple of Augustus, it is hard to see how the hall behind it can be called the temple of Minerva, or how S. Maria Antiqua can be identified with the bibliotheca, even if the suitability of its plan be admitted. On the other hand, it is difficult-we may say impossible-to find any other place for the temple of Augustus, which, as we have seen, was still in existence in 248 A.D. The theory that the whole group may have taken the place of the great peristyle which Caligula erected as a vestibule to the imperial palace on the Palatine above, and have been an imperial reception hall, is rendered improbable by the inadequacy of the approaches from the front hall to those at the back (S. Maria Antiqua); see DOMUS TIBERIANA. See Hulsen, cit. supra; CR 1902, 95; JRS 1919, 177; Boll. d'Arte, 1921, 356 sqq.; Jahrb. d. Inst. xxxvi. 1-36; AJA 1924, 368-398; ZA 91-95.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, HOLOVITREUM (search)
HOLOVITREUM the palace (palatium) of Chromatius, probably Agrestius Chromatius, praef. urbi about 248 A.D. The building took its name from its decoration of glass mosaics representing the heavenly bodies (Acta S. Sebastiani 20 Ian. p. 629; Mirab. 29), and traces of it were found in 1741 when the church of S. Stefano in Piscinula in the Via dei Banchi vecchi was destroyed (Mon. L. i. 548; Jord. ii. 535 ; HJ 597-8).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
e of Juppiter Redux in Castra Peregrina dedicated to Severus and Mammaea, 106. 222-223Repairs to Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum) completed, 6. 227Thermae Neronianae rebuilt, 531. 238The Three Gordians: restore Thermae Suranae, 533. Arch in Castra Praetoria (?), 108. Balinea, 69. Gordian III continues repairs to Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6, and builds a Porticus (?), 422. 247Naumachia of Philippus Arabs, 358. Theatre Qf Pompey burnt, 517. Hecatostylon burnt, 251. 248(ca.). Holovitreum (?), 258. 249-251Reign of Decius: he builds Porticus, 421. 250Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum) restored after a fire, 6. 252Thermae Decianae, 526. 253-268Reign of Gallienus: he plans a Porticus, 422. 262Arch of Gallienus, 39. Horti Liciniani, 268. 270-275Reign of Aurelian: he extends Pomerium, 393; plans Thermae, 524: builds Castra Urbana, 108; increases height of Castra Praetoria, 107. 270Balineum Antiochiani, 68. 272(before). The Walls of Aure
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Jesus was the Messiah foretold in the Old Testament; those in the third exhibit within a short compass the great moral and religious obligations of the Christian life. The precise date at which this compilation was arranged is unknown, but it probably belongs to the early part of Cyprian's career. It is quoted by Jerome (Dial. I. adv. Pelag.) and by Augustin. (Contra duas Epist. Pelag. 4.8, 10.) 4. De Disciplina et Habitu Virginum liber De Disciplina et Habitu Virginum liber, written in A. D. 248, the year in which he was raised to the episcopate, in imitation of the dissertations of Tertullian, " De Virginibus velandis," " De Habitu Mulierum," &c., the object being to enforce upon those holy maidens who had made a vow of celibacy the necessity of simplicity in their dress and manner of life. He commences with an encomium on virginity, insists upon the propriety of abstaining from all sumptuous apparel and vain ornaments, from paint, from frequenting baths, marriages, or public spe
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Quadra'tus, Asi'nius lived in the times of Philippus I. and II., emperors of Rome (A. D. 244-249), and wrote two historical works in the Greek language. 1. A history of Rome, in fifteen books, in the Ionic dialect, called *Xiliethri/s, because it related the history of the city, from its foundation to the thousandth year of its nativity (A. D. 248), when the Ludi Saeculares were performed with extraordinary pomp. It probably passed over with brevity the times of the republic, and dwelt at greater length upon the imperial period. Suidas says that the work came down to Alexander, the son of Manaea; but this is a mistake, as Alexander died fifteen years before the thousandth year of Rome. (Suidas, s. v. *Kodra/tos ; Steph. Byz. s. vv. *)/Anqion, *Qayi/polis, *)Ocu/bioi ; D. C. 70.3; Zosim. 5.27; Vulcat. Gall. Avid. Cass. 1 ; Agathias, i. p. 17c.) 2. A history of Parthia, which is frequently quoted by Stephanus Byzantinus under the title of *Parqika\ or *Parquhnika/. (Quadratus belli Par