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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
eign of Decius: he builds Porticus, 421. 250Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum) restored after a fire, 6. 252Thermae Decianae, 526. 253-268Reign of Gallienus: he plans a Porticus, 422. 262Arch of Gallienus, 39. Horti Liciniani, 268. 270-275Reign of Aurelian: he extends Pomerium, 393; plans Thermae, 524: builds Castra Urbana, 108; increases height of Castra Praetoria, 107. 270Balineum Antiochiani, 68. 272(before). The Walls of Aurelian, 348. Porta Nomentana, 410. 273Temple of the Sun, 491. 276-282Reign of Probus: Pons Probi, 401. 282-284Reign of Carinus: fresco in Palace, 379. 283Great fire in Forum, 234; destroys Forum Julium, 226: Theatre of Pompey, 517: Porticus of Pompey, 428: Graccostadium, 248: Basilica Julia, 79: Curia, 144. 284-305Reign of Diocletian: he restores Forum, 234: Basilica Julia, 79, 80: Curia, 144: seven bases along Via Sacra, 234: Porticus Pompeia (Porticus Herculea et Jovia), 428;
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ad received the Roman franchise, through the influence of some Cassius Longinus, he bore the name of Dionysius Longinus, Cassius Longinus, or in the complete form given at the head of this article. He was born about A. D. 213, and was killed in A. D. 273, at the age of sixty. His native place is uncertain; some say that he was born at Palmyra, and others call him a Syrian or a native of Emesa. The belief that he was of Syrian origin is only an inference from the fact that his mother was a Syriadent lover of liberty, advised and encouraged her to shake off the Roman yoke, and assert her dignity as an independent sovereign. In consequence of this, Zenobia wrote a spirited letter to the Roman emperor Aurelian. (Vopisc. Aurelian. 27.) In A. D. 273, when Aurelian took and destroyed Palmyra, Longinus had to pay with his life for the advice which he had given to Zenobia. (Vopisc. Aurelian. 30; Suid. s. v. *Loggi=nos.) This catastrophe must have been the more painful to Longinus, since the q
hree successive bishops of Antioch to excommunicate him, or else to induce him to withdraw with his followers from communion with them. According to Valesius and Tillemont the three bishops were Domnus, the successor of Paul of Samosata (A. D. 269-273), Timaeus (A. D. 273-280), and Cyrillus (A. D. 280-300) ; and Tillemont dates his separation from A. D. 269, and thinks it continued ten or twelve years. The testimony of Alexander, patriarch of Alexandria (apud Theodoret, H. E. 1.4), who was partA. D. 273-280), and Cyrillus (A. D. 280-300) ; and Tillemont dates his separation from A. D. 269, and thinks it continued ten or twelve years. The testimony of Alexander, patriarch of Alexandria (apud Theodoret, H. E. 1.4), who was partly contemporary with Lucian, makes the fact of this separation indisputable. He states that Lucian remained out of communion with the church for many years; and that he was the successor in heresy of Paul of Samosata, and the precursor of Arins. Arins himself, in a letter to Eusebius of Nicomedeia (apud Theodoret, H. E. 1.5), addresses his friend as sulloukianista "fellow-Lucianist," which may be considered as intimating that Lucian held opinions similar to his own; though, as Arius would, in h
Menela'us 3. Of Aegae, an epic poet, who among other works which are not specified, wrote an epic poem, Thebais (*Qhbai/s), consisting, according to Suidas, of twelve, and according to Eudocia, of thirteen books. As Longinus mentioned Menelaus with praise, he must have lived before A. D. 273, for in that year Longinus died (Waltz, Rhet. Graec. vi. p. 93; Ruhnken, Dissert. de Vit. et Script. Longini, 30, &c. ed. Toupius). The first five books of this epic are referred to by Stephanus Byzantinus (s. vv. *Te/mmic, *(Urmi/nh, *)Amfige/neia, *Lu/kaia, *Eu\)trhsis), but no fragments of any importance have come down to us. [L.S]
et, however, which was used for the inscription, was not sudden. Some coins which have portraits of a Sassanian character have names and titles in Nagari letters ; some have bilingual inscriptions. Great numbers of Sassanian coins of different periods, though very few only of the earliest period, have been, and are still found, at Kabul and at other places in Afghanistan." Shapur I. 2. SHAPUR or SAPOR I. (*Sapw/rhs or *Sabw/rhs), the son and successor of Ardishir I., reigned from A. D. 240-273. Soon after his succession a war broke out with the Romans, which was occasioned by the hostile conduct of Shapur against Armenia. The Romans, commanded by the emperor Gordian, were at first successful, but afterwards suffered some defeats, and the murder of Gordian, in 244, put a check to their further progress. On the other hand the Persians were unable to subdue Armenia, which was nobly defended by king Chosroes, who, however, was assassinated after a resistance of nearly thirty years. Sha
Shapur I. 2. SHAPUR or SAPOR I. (*Sapw/rhs or *Sabw/rhs), the son and successor of Ardishir I., reigned from A. D. 240-273. Soon after his succession a war broke out with the Romans, which was occasioned by the hostile conduct of Shapur against Armenia. The Romans, commanded by the emperor Gordian, were at first successful, but afterwards suffered some defeats, and the murder of Gordian, in 244, put a check to their further progress. On the other hand the Persians were unable to subdue Armenia, which was nobly defended by king Chosroes, who, however, was assassinated after a resistance of nearly thirty years. Shapur had contrived this murder. His son, Tiridates, being an infant, the Armenians implored the assistance of the emperor Valerian; but before the Romans appeared in the field, Armenia was subdued, and Shapur conquered Mesopotamia (258). Upon this Valerian put himself at the head of his army, He met Sapor near Edessa, on the Euphrates, and a pitched battle was fought, in which