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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 300 AD or search for 300 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TETRICUS, DOMUS (search)
TETRICUS, DOMUS on the Caelian: opposite the temple of Isis (v. INTER DUOS LUCOS). It was probably close to the boundary betweenRegions II and III, near SS. Quattro Coronati (Rev. Etudes Anc. 1914, 213-214; AJA 1914, 530), and was called pulcherrima at the beginning of the fourth century (Hist. Aug. xxx. tyr. 25). It belonged to C. Pius Esuvius Tetricus, who was defeated by Aurelian in 274 A.D. V. Domaszewski (SHA 1916, 7. A, io; 1918, 13. A, 49; 1920, 6. A, 28) regards the whole passage as a sheer invention.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALATIUM LICINIANUM (search)
iroli (act. S. Bibianae, cod. Vat. 6696: ad caput tauri iuxta palatium Licinianum ad formam Claudii; Mirabil. 27; Here we find the form Palatium Licinii. cf. LPD i. 249, vit. Simplic. I: fecit basilicam intra urbe Roma iuxta palatium Licinianum beatae martyris Bibianae ubi corpus eius requiescit; Passio SS. Fausti et Pigmenii, catal. codd. hagiogr. bibl. Paris. i. 522: in cubiculo Romano iuxta palatium Licinianum). It is natural to connect this with the HORTI LICINIANI (q.v.) or gardens of the Emperor Licinius Gallienus, and the arch of Gallienus at the old porta Esquilina, and it has been conjectured that by 300 A.D. the district between the Viae Tiburtina and Labicana and the wall of Aurelian had largely come into the possession of the emperors, and that the term, palatium Licinianum, was applied to the complex of buildings in the horti, including the existing NYMPHAEUM (2) (q.v.). This, however, is as yet merely conjecture (LPD i. 250; LR 402-406; BC 1874, 55; HJ 359; HCh 213).