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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 23 23 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Artabanus III. (search)
tabanus sent an embassy to Germanicus to renew the alliance with the Romans. (Tac. Ann. 2.56, 58.) After the death of Germanicus, Artabanus began to treat the Romans with contempt, placed Arsaces, one of his sons, over Armenia, and sent an embassy into Syria to demand the treasures which Vonones had carried with him out of Parthia. He also oppressed his subjects, till at length two of the chief men among the Parthians, Sinnaces, and the eunuch, Abdus, despatched an embassy to Tiberius in A. D. 35, to beg him to send to Parthia Phraates, one of the sons of Phraates IV. Tiberius willingly complied with the request; but Phraates upon arriving in Syria was carried off by a disease, which was brought on by his disusing the Roman mode of living, to which he had been accustomed for so many years, and adopting the Parthian habits. As soon as Tiberius heard of his death, he set up Tiridates, another of the Arsacidae, as a claimant to the Parthian throne, and induced Mithridates and his broth
ng of Iberia, who had bribed some of the attendants of Arsaces to kill their master. After his death, which happened ill A. D. 35, Mithridates invaded Armenia and took its capital, Artaxata. Josephus (18.3.4.) calls this Armenian king Orodes, but thi) Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reines.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. TigA. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoen
Arsaces I. The eldest son of Artabanus, king of the Parthians, was placed on the throne of Armenia by his father, after the death of Artaxias III. He perished by the treachery of Mithridates, the brother of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, who had bribed some of the attendants of Arsaces to kill their master. After his death, which happened ill A. D. 35, Mithridates invaded Armenia and took its capital, Artaxata. Josephus (18.3.4.) calls this Armenian king Orodes, but this was the name of his brother, who, as we learn from Tacitus, was sent by the Parthian king to revenge his death. (Tac. Ann. 6.31-33; D. C. 58.26.)
Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.)
Artaxias Iii. The son of Polemon, king of Pontus, was proclaimed king of Armenia by Germanicus in A. D. 18, at the wish of the Armenians, whose favour he had gained by adopting their habits and mode of life. His original name was Zenon, but the Armenians called him Artaxias on his accession. Upon the death of Artaxias, about A. D. 35, Arsaces, the son of the Parthian king, Artabanus, was placed upon the Armenian throne by his father. (Tac. Ann. 2.56, 6.31.)
the wrongs which he himself had suffered, that he did not utter a sound of complaint, and behaved in such a submissive manner, that those who witnessed his conduct declared, that there never was such a cringing slave to so bad a master. (Suet. Cal. 10; Tac. Annal. 6.20.) But his savage and voluptuous character was nevertheless seen through by Tiberius. About the same time he married Junia Claudilla (Claudia), the daughter of M. Silanus, an event which Dio Cassius (58.25) assigns to the year A. D. 35. Soon afterwards he obtained the quaestorship, and on the death of his brother Drusus was made augur in his stead, having been created pontiff two years before. (D. C. 58.8; Suet. (Cal. 12.) After the death of his wife, in March A. D. 36, Caligula began seriously to think in what manner he might secure the succession to himself, of which Tiberius had held out hopes to him, without however deciding anything. (D. C. 58.23 ; Tac. Annal. 6.45, &c.) In order to ensure his success, he seduced E
Clau'dia 14. CLAUDIA, called by Suetonius (Calig. 12) JUNIA CLAUDILLA, was the daughter of M. Junius Silanus, and was married to Caligula, according to Dio Cassius (58.25) in A. D. 35. (Tac. Ann. 6.20, 45.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Gallus, C. Ce'stius with the agnomen Camerinus, a Roman senator of the time of the emperor Tiberius, was consul in A. D. 35, with M. Servilius Nonianus. (Tac. Ann. 3.36, 6.7, 31 ; D. C. 8.25; Plin. Nat. 10.43.) [L.S]
Here'nnius 16. Here'nnius Ca'pito, was procurator of Iamnia, near the coast of Palestine. He arrested Herodes Agrippa [AGRIPPA, HERODES, 1.] for a debt to the imperial treasury, and reported his defalcation and consequent flight to the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35-6. (J. AJ 18.6.3, 4.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Marcia'nus, Gra'nius a Roman senator, was accused of majestas in A. D. 35, by C. Gracchus, and put an end to his own life. (Tac. Ann. 6.38.)
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