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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 1 1 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 357 AD or search for 357 AD in all documents.

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n made sole praefect. The year of their death is not ascertained, but it was not long before that of Ulpian himself, which took place at latest A. D. 228. (D. C. 80.2; Zosim. 1.11; Zonar. 12.15.) Flavia'nus 3. Ulpius Flavianus, consular of the provinces of Aemilia and Liguria, in Italy, under Constantine the Great, A. D. 323. (Cod. Theodos. 11. tit. 16. s. 2; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.) Flavia'nus 4. Proconsul of Africa, apparently under Constantius, son of Constantine the Great, A. D. 357-61. It is probable that this is the proconsul Flavian, to whole some of the rhetorical exercises of the sophist Himerius are addressed; though Fabricius supposes the Flavian of Himerius to be No. 7. (Cod. Theod. 8. tit. 5. s. 10, 11. tit. 36. s. 14, 15. tit. 1. s. 1; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Himerius, ap. Phot. Bibl. Cod. 165, 243, pp. 108, 376, ed. Bekker; Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. vi. p. 57.) Flavia'nus 5. Vicarius of Africa, under Gratian, A. D. 377. He was one of those commis
Flavia'nus 4. Proconsul of Africa, apparently under Constantius, son of Constantine the Great, A. D. 357-61. It is probable that this is the proconsul Flavian, to whole some of the rhetorical exercises of the sophist Himerius are addressed; though Fabricius supposes the Flavian of Himerius to be No. 7. (Cod. Theod. 8. tit. 5. s. 10, 11. tit. 36. s. 14, 15. tit. 1. s. 1; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Himerius, ap. Phot. Bibl. Cod. 165, 243, pp. 108, 376, ed. Bekker; Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. vi. p. 57.)
hough violently hurried from Rome to the presence of the emperor, he chose rather to suffer banishment than to subscribe the condemnation of one, whom he believed innocent. But after two years spent at Beroea, this noble resolution began to fail. He made overtures of submission, probably through Demophilus, the heretic bishop of the city where he had been compelled to take up his abode, and, having been summoned to Sirmium, signed in the presence of the council there assembled (the third, A. D. 357), the Arian creed sanctioned by that conclave [POTAMIUs], and the decrees against Athanasius. Upon this he was permitted to return to Rome, there to exercise a divided power along with a certain Felix, who had been nominated his successor. But the zeal of the people in favour of their ancient pastor frustrated this amicable arrangement. Violent tumults arose, Constantius yielded to the vehement display of popular feeling, Felix resigned, and his departure from the city was signalised by an
on (Gregor. Nyssen. Oratio habit. in funere Meletii), and he probably inherited from them an estate which he possessed in Armenia. (Basil. Epist. 187, editt. vett., 99, ed. Benedict.) His gentleness of disposition, general excellence of charafter, and persuasive eloquence, acquired for him a high reputation: but his first bishopric, that of the Sebaste, in Armenia, in which he succeeded Eustathius [EUSTATHIUS, No. 7], apparently after the latter had been deposed in the council of Melitene (A. D. 357), proved so troublesome, through the contumacy of his people, that he withdrew from his charge and retired to Beroea, now Aleppo in Syria, of which city, according to one rendering of a doubtful expression in Socrates, he became bishop. The East was atthis time torn with the Arian controversy ; but the character of Meletius won the respect of both parties, and each appears to have regarded him as belonging to them, a result promoted by his dwelling, in his discourses, on practical rather t
wer to excite the bad passions of Gallus, and to inflame Constantius against him. Thalassius died in A. D. 353, and was succeeded by Domitian (Amm. Marc. 14.1, 7; Zosim. 2.48). Godefroy maintains that Thalassius could not have died earlier than A. D. 357 because he is said to have been at the conference at Sirmium, which is usually placed in this year, and because the name of Thalassius, praefectus praetorio, occurs in a law dated A. D. 357. But Tillemont has shown that the conference at SirmiA. D. 357. But Tillemont has shown that the conference at Sirmium ought probably to be referred to the year 351; and as Ammianus expressly places the death of Thalassius in A. D. 353, the Thalassius mentioned in the law may have been praefectus praetorio of Illyricum. The matter is discussed by Tillemont, Histoire des Empereurs, vol. iv. note xxix. sur Constance. This Thalassius appears to have written some work on the history of his own times, as Suidas (s. v. *Qeo/filos) quotes his testimony respecting his contemporary Theophilus.
i\ filanqrwpi/as. It was not long after that he fixed his residence at Constantinople, where he taught philosophy for twenty years. In A. D. 355 he was made a senator; amid the letter is still extant, in which Constantius recommends him to the senate, and speaks in the highest terms both of Themistius himself and of his father. We also possess the oration of thanks which Themistius addressed to the senate of Constantinople early in A.D. 356, in reply to the emperor's letter (Orat. ii.). In A. D. 357 he recited in the senate of Constantinople two orations in honour of Constantius, which were intended to have been delivered before the emperor himself, who was then at Rome (Orat. iii. iv.). As the reward of his panegyrics, Constantius conferred upon him the honour of a bronze statue ; and, in A. D. 361, he was appointed to the praetorian dignity by a decree still extant, in which he is mentioned in the following terms, Themistius, cujus auget scientia dignitatem (Cod. Theodos. vi. tit. 4
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Valentinia'nus I. Roman emperor A. D. 364-375, was the son of Gratianus, and was born A. D. 321, at Cibalis in Pannonia. [GRATIANUS.] He bore also the name of Flavius, which was common to all the emperors after Constantine. His first wife was Valeria Severa, by whom he became the father of the emperor Gratianus. Valentinian entered the army when young, and showed military talents; but the emperor Constantinus for some reason or other deprived him of his rank A. D. 357. Under Julian he held the office of tribune of the guard, or of the Scutarii, as Orosius terms the body (7.32), and in this capacity he was with Julian at Antioch, A. D. 362, and accompanied him to a heathen temple. Julian, it is said, commanded him to sacrifice to the idol, or resign his office; but Valentinian, who had been baptized in the Christian faith, refused. According to most of the historians, Valentinian was exiled for his adherence to his religion. Jovian succeeded Julian A. D. 363, and Lucilianus, the fat