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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TURCII, DOMUS (search)
TURCII, DOMUS between the Saepta and the porticus Divorum, in the campus Martius, south of S. Marco, where remains and inscriptions have been found (CIL vi. 1772, 1773). L. Turcius Secundus was praef. urbi in 363 A.D.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
aniculum destroyed, 295. 344-345Baths of Agrippa restored, 518. 352-353Equus Constantii, 201. 356Visit of Constantius: base in Comitium, 137; Pantheon, 385. 357Constantius sets up obelisk in Circus Maximus, 118, 367. 357-362Mithraeum of Tamesius, 345. 357Altar of Victory in Curia removed, 570. 358(ca.). Balnea Neratii Cerealis, 70. 360-363Julian: Temple of Juppiter Heliopolitanus on Janiculum rebuilt, 295; base in Comitium, 137; altar of Victory in Curia restored (?), 570. 363Temple of Apollo Palatinus burnt, 18. 364-378Macellum Liviae restored, 322. 365-367Valentinian I restores Pons Aurelius, 399. 367Porticus of the Dei Consentes rebuilt, 421. 370Pons Cestius rebuilt as Pons Gratianus, 399. 370(ca.). Pantheon used for civil purposes, 385, n. 3. 374(ca.). Forum Palatinum, 229. Porticus Boni Eventus, 420. 379-383Arcus Gratiani Valentiniani et Theodosii, 40. 380Porticus Maximae, 423. 381Anio Novus repaired, 12. 382Altar of Victory in Curia again removed, 570.
l. 163) thought the best work on the subject, though containing some marvellous and incredible things. Possible treatise concerning Sympathies and Antipathies Our Anatolius may also be identical with the author of a treatise concerning Sympathies and Antipathies (peri\ *Sumpaqeiw=n kai\ *)Antipaqeiw=n) the remains of which may be found in Fabricius (Bibl. Gr. iv. p.29); but we are rather disposed to attribute this work to Anatolius the philosopher, who was the master of Iamblichus (Brucker, Hist. Phil. vol. ii. p. 260), and to whom Porphyry addressed Homeric Questions. Other contemporaries named Anatolius Other contemporaries of the same name are mentioned by Libanius, and errors have frequently been committed from the great number of Anatolii who held office under the Roman emperors. Thus our Anatolius has been confounded with the magister officiorum who fell in the battle against the Persians at Maranga, A. D. 363, in which Julian was slain. (Am. Marc. 20.9.8, 25.6.5.) [J.T.G]
marry Olympias, the daughter of the praefect Ablavius, a near relation of the empress Constantia, and who had been betrothed to Constans, the brother of Constantius. Olympias was afterwards poisoned by a mistress of Sapor, an Armenian princess of the name of P'harhandsem. To punish the defection of Arsaces, Sapor invaded Armenia and took Tigranocerta. He was thus involved in a war with the emperor Julian, the successor of Constantius, who opened his famous campaign against the Persians (A. D. 363) in concert with Arsaces, on whose active co-operation the success of the war in a great measure depended. But Julian's sanguine expectations of overthrowing the power of the Sassanidae was destroyed by the pusillanimity, or more probably well calculated treachery, of Arsaces, who withdrew his troops from the Roman camp near Ctesiphon in the month of June, 363. Thence the disastrous retreat of the Romans and the death of Julian, who died from a wound on the 26th of the same month. Jovian,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
marry Olympias, the daughter of the praefect Ablavius, a near relation of the empress Constantia, and who had been betrothed to Constans, the brother of Constantius. Olympias was afterwards poisoned by a mistress of Sapor, an Armenian princess of the name of P'harhandsem. To punish the defection of Arsaces, Sapor invaded Armenia and took Tigranocerta. He was thus involved in a war with the emperor Julian, the successor of Constantius, who opened his famous campaign against the Persians (A. D. 363) in concert with Arsaces, on whose active co-operation the success of the war in a great measure depended. But Julian's sanguine expectations of overthrowing the power of the Sassanidae was destroyed by the pusillanimity, or more probably well calculated treachery, of Arsaces, who withdrew his troops from the Roman camp near Ctesiphon in the month of June, 363. Thence the disastrous retreat of the Romans and the death of Julian, who died from a wound on the 26th of the same month. Jovian,
emperor Julian, who likewise heard him, probably during his visit at Athens in A. D. 355 and 356 (Eunap. Himer.; Liban. Orat. x. p. 267, ed. Morel.; Zosimus, Hist. Eccles. 3.2), conceived so great an admiration for Himerius, that soon after he invited him to his court at Antioch, A. D. 362, and made him his secretary. (Tzetz. Chil. 6.128.) Himerius did not return to Athens till after the death of his rival, Proaeresius (A. D. 368), although the emperor Julian had fallen five years before, A. D. 363. He there took his former position again, and distinguished himself both by his instruction and his oratory. He lived to an advanced age, but the latter years were not free from calamities, for he lost his only promising son, Rufinus, and was blind during the last period of his life. According to Suidas, he died in a fit of epilepsy (i(era\ no/sos). Himerius was a Pagan, and, like Libanius and other eminent men, remained a Pagan, though we do not perceive in his writings any hatred or an
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Jovia'nus, Fla'vius Clau'dius Roman emperor (A. D. 363-364), was the son of the Comes Varronianus, one of the most distinguished generals of his time, who had retired from public life when the accession of his son took place. Jovianus was primus ordinis domesticorum, or captain of the lifeguards of the emperor Julian, and accompanied him on his unhappy campaign against the Persians. Julian having been slain on the field of battle, on the 26th of June, A. D. 363, and the election of another empA. D. 363, and the election of another emperor being urgent, on account of the danger in which the Roman army was placed, the choice of the leaders fell first upon their veteran brother Sallustius Secundus, who, however, dedined the honour, and proposed Jovian. The merits of his father more than his own induced the Roman generals to follow the advice of their colleague, and Jovian was proclaimed emperor on the day after the death of Julian. He immediately professed himself to be a Christian. The principal and most difficult task of the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Clau'dius Apostata (search)
Julia'nus, Fla'vius Clau'dius or Clau'dius Apostata surnamed APOSTATA, "the Apostate," Roman emperor, A. D. 361-363, was born at Constantinople on the 17th of November, A. D. 331 (332?). He was the son of Julius Constantius by his second wife, Basilina, the grandson of Constantius Chlorus by his second wife, Theodora, and the nephew of Constantine the Great. [See the Genealogical Table, Vol. I. pp. 831, 832.] Julian and his elder brother, Flavius Julius Gallus, who was the son of Julius Constantius by his first wife, Galla, were the only members of the imperial family whose lives were spared by Constantius II., the son of Constantine the Great, when, upon his accession, he ordered the massacre of all the male descendants of Constantine Chlorus and his second wife, Theodora. Both Gallus and Julian were of too tender an age to be dangerous to Constantius, who accordingly spared their lives, but had them educated in strict confinement at different places in Ionia and Bithynia, and aft
eavour to restore the oracle of Apollo to its former splendour and authority; but in this mission he failed, as the only answer he brought back was that the oracle was no more:-- ei)/pate tw=| basilei=, xamai\ te/ se dai/dalos au)la/. ou)ke/ti *Foi=bos e)/xei kalu/ban, ou) ma/ntida da/fnhn ou) paga\n lale/ousen, a)pe/sbeto kai\ la/lon u(/dwr. Cedren. Hist. Conpend.p. 304, ed. 1647. He accompanied Julian in his expedition against Persia, and was with him at the time of his death, June 26, A. D. 363. (Philostorg. l.c.) The succeeding emperors, Valentinian and Valens, were not so favourably disposed towards Oribasius, but confiscated his property, and banished him to some nation of "barbarians" (as they are called)-pro bably the Goths: they had even thought of putting him to death. The cause of this treatment is not mentioned; his friend Eunapius (who is not a very impartial witness) attributes it to envy on account of his reputation (dia\ th\n u(peroxh\n th=s do/chs), but we may easil
Scythopolis, and one of the leaders of the Eusebian or semi-Arian party in the fourth century. He was deposed at the council of Seleuceia (A. D. 359.) for contumllacy, having refused to appear before the council to answer the charges of the presbyter Dorotheuis. (Socrat. H. E. 2.40; Sozoimn. 4.22. He must have died soon after, for his remains were disinterred and insultingly treated (Theophanes, Chronographia) during the re-action which followed the temporary triumph of paganismti (A. D. 361-363) under Julian the apostate [JULIANUS]. Patrophilus appears to have been eminent for scriptural knowledge. Eusebius of Emesa is said to have derived his expositions of Scripture from the instructions of Patrophilus and Eusebius of Caesareia (Socrat. H. E. 2.9); but Sixtus Senensis is mistaken in ascribing to Patrophilus a translation of the Old Testament from Hebrew into Greek. (Sixtus Senens. Biblioth. Sautca, lib. iv.; Le Long, Biblioth. Sacra, recensita ah A .G. Masch. Pars ii. vol. ii. sec
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