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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 28 28 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cn. Acerro'nius Proculus consul A. D. 37, the year in which Tiberius died (Tac. Ann. 6.45; Suet. Tib. 73), was perhaps a descendant of the Cn. Acerronius, whom Cicero mentions in his oration for Tullius, B. C. 71, as a vir optimus. (16, &c.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Agri'cola, Gnaeus Julius is one of the most remarkable men whom we meet with in the times of the first twelve emperors of Rome, for his extraordinary ability as a general, his great powers, shewn in his government of Britain, and borne witness to by the deep and universal feeling excited in Rome by his death (Tac. Agric. 43), his singular integrity, and the esteem and love which he commanded in all the private relations of life. His life of 55 years (from June 13th, A. D. 37, to the 23rd August, A. D. 93) extends through the reigns of the nine emperors from Caligula to Domitian. He was born at the Roman colony of Forum Julii, the modern Fréjus in Provence. His father was Julius Graecinus of senatorial rank; his mother Julia Procilla, who throughout his education seems to have watched with great care and to have exerted great influence over him. He studied philosophy (the usual education of a Roman of higher rank) from his earliest youth at Marseilles. His first military service was
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Agrippa the Great (search)
re his wife succeeded in procuring a supply of money from Alexander the Alabarch. He then set sail, and landed at Puteoli. He was favourably received by Tiberius, who entrusted him with the education of his grandson Tiberius. He also formed an intimacy with Caius Caligula. Having one day incautiously expressed a wish that the latter might soon succeed to the throne, his words were reported by his freedman Eutychus to Tiberius, who forthwith threw him into prison. Caligula, on his accession (A. D. 37), set him at liberty, and gave him the tetrarchies of Lysanias (Abilene) and Philippus (Batanaca, Trachonitis, and Auranitis). He also presented him with a golden chain of equal weight with the iron one which he had worn in prison. In the following year Agrippa took possession of his kingdom, and after the banishment of Herodes Antipas, the tetrarchy of the latter was added to his dominions. On the death of Caligula, Agrippa, who was at the time in Rome, materially assisted Claudius in ga
Albucilla the wife of Satrius Secundus, and infamous for her many amours, was accused in the last year of the reign of Tiberius (A. D. 37) of treason, or impiety, against the emperor (impietatis in principem), and, with her, Cn. Domitus Ahenobarbus, Vibius Marsus, and L. Arruntius, as accomplices. She was cast into prison by command of the senate, after making an ineffectual attempt to destroy herself. (Tac. Ann. 6.47, 48.)
Anto'nia 6. The younger of the two daughters of M. Antonius by Octavia, born about B. C. 36, was married to Drusus, the brother of the emperor Tiberius, by whom she had three children: 1. Germanicus, the father of the emperor Caligula; 2. Livia or Livilla; and 3. the emperor Claudius. She lived to see the accession of her grandson Caligula to the throne, A. D. 37, who at first conferred upon her the greatest honours, but afterwards treated her with so much contempt, that her death was hastened by his conduct : according to some accounts, he administered poison to her. The emperor Claudius paid the highest honours to her memory. Pliny (Plin. Nat. 35.36.16) speaks of a temple of Antonia, which was probably built at the command of Claudius. Antonia was celebrated for her beauty, virtue, and chastity. Her portrait on the annexed coin supports the accounts which are given of her beauty. (Plut. Ant. 87; Dio Cass. Iviii. 11, 59.3, 60.5; Suet. Cal. 1.15, 23; Tac. Ann. 3.3, 18, 11.3; Val Max.
the daughter of Aretas, in consequence of having formed an incestuous connexion with Herodias, his brother Philip's wife, as we learn from the Evangelists. To revenge the wrongs of his daughter, Aretas made war upon Herod, and defeated him in a great battle. Herod applied for assistance to the Romans; and Vitellius, the governor of Syria, received an order to punish Aretas. He accordingly marched against Petra; but while he was on the road, he received intelligence of the death of Tiberius (A. D. 37), and gave up the expedition in consequence. (J. AJ 18.5. §§ 1, 3.) This Aretas seems to have been the same who had possession of Damascus at the time of the conversion of the Apostle Paul, A. D. 31. (2 Corinth. 11.32, 33; Acts 9.19-25.) It is not improbable that Aretas obtained possession of Damascus in a war with Herod at an earlier period than Josephus has mentioned; as it seems likely that Aretas would have resented the affront soon after it was given, instead of allowing so many years
In A. D. 15, when the Tiber had flooded a great part of the city, he was appointed to take measures to restrain it within its bed, and he consulted the senate on the subject. The province of Spain had been assigned to him, but Tiberius, through jealousy, kept him at Rome ten years after his appointment, and obliged him to govern the province by his legates. He was accused on one occasion by Aruseius and Sanquinius, but was acquitted, and his accusers punished. He was subsequently charged in A. D. 37, as an accomplice in the crimes of Albucilla; and though his friends wished him to delay his death, as Tiberius was in his last illness, and could not recover, he refused to listen to their advice, as he knew the wickedness of Caligula, who would succeeed to the empire, and accordingly put himself to death by opening his veins. (Tac. Ann. 1.8, 13, 76, 79, 6.27, Hist. 2.65, Ann. 6.5, 7, 47, 48; D. C. 55.25, 58.27.) It was either this Arruntius or his father, in all probability, who wrote a
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), VII. Laelii Balbi. (search)
VII. Laelii Balbi. Balbus 1. D. Laelius Balbus, D. F. D. N., one of the quindecemviri who superintended the celebration of the saecular games in B. C. 17 (Fast. Capitol.), and consul in B. C. 6. (D. C. 4.9.) Balbus 2. Laelius Balbus, accused Acutia, formerly the wife of P. Vitellius, of treason (majestas), but was unable to obtain the usual reward after her condemnation, in consequence of the intercession of the tribune Junius Otho. He was condemned in A. D. 37 as one of the paramours of Albucilla, deprived of his senatorial rank, and banished to an island: his condemnation gave general satisfaction, as he had been ever ready to accuse the innocent. (Tac. Ann. 6.47, 48.)
Balbus 2. Laelius Balbus, accused Acutia, formerly the wife of P. Vitellius, of treason (majestas), but was unable to obtain the usual reward after her condemnation, in consequence of the intercession of the tribune Junius Otho. He was condemned in A. D. 37 as one of the paramours of Albucilla, deprived of his senatorial rank, and banished to an island: his condemnation gave general satisfaction, as he had been ever ready to accuse the innocent. (Tac. Ann. 6.47, 48.)
emperor on the 24th of January, A. D. 41, and did not enter upon his second consulship until the 1st of January, A. D. 42. Tacitus also has committed a blunder upon the point, for he tells us, in one place (Ann. 12.25), that Britannicus was two years younger than Nero; and we learn from another (Ann. 13.15), that he was murdered at the beginning of A. D. 55, a few days before he had completed his fourteenth year. But we can prove, from Tacitus himself (Ann. 12.58, 13.6), that Nero was born A. D. 37, and from Suetonius that the event took place upon the 15th of December; therefore, according to this last assertion, Britannicus must have been born in the year 39 or at the beginning of 40 at latest; but this would bring him to the completion of his fifteenth year in 55. If Britannicus was born on the twentieth day after his father's accession, then he would be on the eve of completing his fourteenth year in January, 55; if he was born in the second consulship of Claudius, and this seems
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