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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, DECENNENSES (search)
DECENNENSES a name found on an inscription (CIL vi. 31893) of c. 370 A.D., applied to those who dwelt in the Decennium or Decenniae. This was the swampy depression south-west of the Lateran, outside the Aurelian wall, through which the Marrana This stream, which is fed by the springs of the AQUA IULIA (q.v.), was brought to Rome by Calixtus II in 1122 (LA 325-327); see also CIRCUS MAXIMUS. flows. Decennium is a conjectural form; Decenniae appears in mediaeval documents (cf. Jord. ii. 318; HJ 220; BC 1891, 343, 355-6; RE iv. 2267).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AMPELIUS, DOMUS (search)
AMPELIUS, DOMUS the house on the Quirinal, belonging to P. Ampelius of Antioch, praefectus urbi in 370 A.D., which was described as parvae aedes sub clivo Salutis (Sym. v. 54. 2).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PANTHEON (search)
ght of the later rotunda, is doubtful. but a marble pavement of an intermediate period (perhaps that of Domitian) was also found actually above this earlier structure, but below the marble pavement of the pronaos. The restoration of Severus and Caracalla has been already mentioned; but after it, except for the account by Ammianus Marcellinus, already cited, of Constantius' visit to it, we hear nothing There is a mention of it in Cod. Theod. xiiii. 3. 10, lecta in Pantheo non. Nov. (368 or 370 A.D.). Cf. BC 1926, 64, 65. of its history until in 609 Boniface IV dedicated the building as the church of S. Maria ad Martyres (LP lxviii. 2). Constantius II removed the bronze tiles in 663 (ib. lxxviii. 3; cf. Paul Diac. Hist. Langob. 5. II; AJA 1899, 40); and it was only Gregory III who placed a lead roof over it (ib. xcii. 12). That the pine-cone of the Vatican came from the Pantheon is a mediaeval fable; it was a fountain perhaps connected with the SERAPEUM (q.v.). The description of it
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PONS CESTIUS (search)
bank of the river. It is mentioned only in Not. app. and Pol. Silv. (545), but probably was built soon after the pons Fabricius. Several Cestii of some prominence are known in this period, and the bridge was probably constructed by one of them, while curator viarum, between 62 and 27 B.C. In the fourth century the pons Cestius was replaced by what was practically a new structure, which the Emperors Valentinian I, Valens and Gratian finished in 369 (Sym. Pan. in Grat. p. 332) and dedicated in 370 as the pons Gratiani. There were two inscriptions recording this event, each in duplicate, the first cut on marble slabs placed on the parapet on each side of the bridge, the second beneath the parapet (CILvi. 1175, 1176). One of the former So also are both the latter (cf. ib. 31250, 31251). is still in situ. The pons Gratiani was 48 metres long and 8.20 wide, with one central arch, 23.65 metres in span, and a small arch on each side, 5.80 metres wide. The material was tufa and peperino with
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THEATRUM MARCELLI (search)
i. 32328, 33 ; EE viii. 271, 285). It is found on sundry inscriptions as an indication of location (Fast. Allif. Vail. a. d. xvi Kal. Sept., CIL i². 217, 240, Amit. a. d. xv Kal. Nov., 12. p. 245: Iano ad theatrum Marcelli; Urb. CIL i². 252, 339; vi. 9868: sagarius a theatro Marcelli; 10028; 33838 a: coactor a theatro Marcelliano); in Servius incidentally (Aen. vii. 607, cf. Jord. i. 2, 347); and in Reg. (Reg. IX). Some of the travertine blocks used in the restoration of the pons Cestius in 370 A.D. were taken from this theatre (NS 1886, 159), which may perhaps indicate that the destruction of the building had begun by that time, although Petronius Maximus, prefect of the city, set up statues within it in 421, and one inscribed pedestal was found in situ in the eighth century by the compiler of the Einsiedeln Itinerary (CIL vi. 1650). Hulsen has shown (RPA i. 169-174; HCh 226 (S. Caeciliae de Monte Faffo, cf. 337 Cf. also BC 1925, 64. ) that the name templum Marcelli still clung to
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
in Comitium, 137; altar of Victory in Curia restored (?), 570. 363Temple of Apollo Palatinus burnt, 18. 364-378Macellum Liviae restored, 322. 365-367Valentinian I restores Pons Aurelius, 399. 367Porticus of the Dei Consentes rebuilt, 421. 370Pons Cestius rebuilt as Pons Gratianus, 399. 370(ca.). Pantheon used for civil purposes, 385, n. 3. 374(ca.). Forum Palatinum, 229. Porticus Boni Eventus, 420. 379-383Arcus Gratiani Valentiniani et Theodosii, 40. 380Porticus Maximae, 423. 381A370(ca.). Pantheon used for civil purposes, 385, n. 3. 374(ca.). Forum Palatinum, 229. Porticus Boni Eventus, 420. 379-383Arcus Gratiani Valentiniani et Theodosii, 40. 380Porticus Maximae, 423. 381Anio Novus repaired, 12. 382Altar of Victory in Curia again removed, 570. Mansiones Saliorum Palatinorum restored, 326. 384-387Pons Probi rebuilt, 401. Valentinian and Valens set up statues in Thermae Antoninianae, 521. 395-423Reign of Honorius: Quadriga for victory over Gildo (398 A.D.), 145; Pompey's Theatre restored, 517. 403Monument for victory at Pollentia, 145. Aurelian walls restored, 349; gates, 403, 404, 407, 409, 412. 404Last gladiatorial combats in Amphithe