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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS MAXIMAE (search)
PORTICUS MAXIMAE built about 380 A.D. along the street, possibly the VIA TECTA (q.v.), leading from the theatre of Balbus to the pons Aelius (CIL vi. 1184). Fragments of granite columns have been found in the Via dei Cappellari and near Piazza Farnese (Ann. d. Inst. 1883, 21; NS 1880, 81; LF 20; HJ 597) as well as in the Piazza del Pianto and the Via della Reginella, which may belong to these porticus (see also BC 1911, 88), and numerous columns and architectural fragments between the Corso Vittorio Emanuele and the Vie Sora and del Pellegrino (NS 1919, 39-40; 1923, 247; PT 62).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
um rebuilt, 295; base in Comitium, 137; altar of Victory in Curia restored (?), 570. 363Temple of Apollo Palatinus burnt, 18. 364-378Macellum Liviae restored, 322. 365-367Valentinian I restores Pons Aurelius, 399. 367Porticus of the Dei Consentes rebuilt, 421. 370Pons Cestius rebuilt as Pons Gratianus, 399. 370(ca.). Pantheon used for civil purposes, 385, n. 3. 374(ca.). Forum Palatinum, 229. Porticus Boni Eventus, 420. 379-383Arcus Gratiani Valentiniani et Theodosii, 40. 380Porticus Maximae, 423. 381Anio Novus repaired, 12. 382Altar of Victory in Curia again removed, 570. Mansiones Saliorum Palatinorum restored, 326. 384-387Pons Probi rebuilt, 401. Valentinian and Valens set up statues in Thermae Antoninianae, 521. 395-423Reign of Honorius: Quadriga for victory over Gildo (398 A.D.), 145; Pompey's Theatre restored, 517. 403Monument for victory at Pollentia, 145. Aurelian walls restored, 349; gates, 403, 404, 407, 409, 412. 404Last glad
om he accompanied in the Persian expedition, and that he was alive in the reign of Valentinian and Valens, to the latter of whom his book is dedicated. To these particulars our certain information is limited. That he is the same individual with the Eutropius who, as we learn from Ammianus Marcellinus, was proconsul of Asia about A. D. 371, and who is spoken of by Libanius and Gregory Nazianzen, or with the Eutropius who, as we gather from the Codex Theodosianus, was praefectus praetorio in A. D. 380 and 381, are pure conjectures resting upon no base save the identity of name and embarrassed by chronological difficulties. In no case must he be confounded with the ambitious eunuch, great chamberlain to the emperor Arcadius, so well known from the invective of Claudian; and still less could he have been the disciple of Augustin, as not a few persons have fancied, since, if not actually dead, he must have reached the extreme verge of old age at the epoch when the bishop of Hippo was risin
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Hiero'nymus or St. Jerome (search)
iii. p. 698.) 8. Commentarius in Danielem Commentarius in Danielem in one book. Written A. D. 407, after the completion of the notes on the minor prophets, and before the death of Stilicho. See praef. (Ed. Bened. vol. iii. p. 1072.) 9. Homiliae Origenis XXVIII. in Jeremium et Ezechielem, Homiliae Origenis XXVIII. in Jeremium et Ezechielem, forming a single work, and not two, as Erasmus and Huetius supposed. Translated at Constantinople after the completion of the Eusebian Chronicle (A. D. 380), and before the letter to Pope Damasus on the Seraphim (Ep. xviii.), written in 381. Vol. VI. 10. Commentarii in XII. Prophetas minores, Commentarii in XII. Prophetas minores, drawn up at intervals between A. D. 392 and 406. Nahum, Micah, Zephaniah, Haggai, and Habakkuk were printed in 392, Jonah in 397, Obadiah probably in 403, the remainder in 406. (Ed. Bened. vol. iii. p. 1234-1806.) Vol. VII. 11. Commentarii in Matthaeum, Commentarii in Matthaeum, in four books. They belong
btained possession of the patriarchate, and Lucius in turn was obliged to flee to Constantinople. This was probably in A. D. 377 or 378, not long before the death of Valens. Whether Lucius was ever restored is doubtful; if he was, he was soon again expelled by the emperor Theodosius. According to some authorities he still remained director of the Arian churches in his patriarchal city. He withdrew from Constantinople at the time of the expulsion of Demophilus, Arian patriarch of that city (A. D. 380), and nothing more is known of him. Works Letters and small works He wrote, according to Jerome, Solemnes de Paschate Epistolae, and a few little books (libelli) on various subjects. The acts of the Lateran Council, A. D. 649, contain an extract from his *Ei)s to\ pa/sxa lo/gos, Sermo in Pascha. Whether this Sermo was one of what Jerome has described as Solemnes Epistolae, is not certain. Further Information Socrat. H. E. 3.4, 4.21, 22, 24, 37; Sozomen, H. E. 6.19, 20, 39; Theodore
of Sebste, (now Siwas) in the Lesser Armenia. A passage of Theodoret (H. E. 4.30) has been thought to imply that he was raised to the episcopate during the reign of Valens, which terminated in A. D. 378; but the passage only implies that he took an active part in the struggle carried on during that reign by the bishops of the orthodox party against Arianism. which he might very well do, though not himself a bishop. His elevation preceded the second general council, that of Constantinople, A. D. 380-381, in which he took part. (Theodoret, H. E. 5.8.) In what year he died is not known : but it was probably after A. D. 391; and certainly before the death of his brother, Gregory of Nyssa (who survived till A. D. 394, or later), for Gregory was present sent at Sebaste at the first celebration of his brother's memory, i. e. the anniversary of his death, which occurred in hot weather, and therefore could not have been in January of March, where the martyrologies place it. (Greg. Nyssen, Epi
gment published by Dodwell (see below), when Rhodon, who succeeded Didymus in the charge of the Catechetical school of Alexandria, transferred that school to Side, Philip became one of his pupils. If we suppose Didymus to have retained the charge of the school till his death, A. D. 396 [DIDYMUS, No. 4], at the advanced age of 86, the removal of the school cannot have taken place long before the close of the century, and we may infer that Philip's birth could scarcely have been earlier than A. D. 380. He was a kinsman of Troilus of Side, the rhetorician, who was tutor to Socrates the ecclesiastical historic, and was indeed so eminent that Philip regarded his relationship to him as a subject of exultation (Socrates, H. E. 7.27). Having entered the church, he was ordained deacon, and had much intercourse with Chrysostom; in the titles of some MSS. he is styled his Syncellns, or personal attendant, which makes it probable that he was, from the early part of his ecclesiastical career, con
gment published by Dodwell (see below), when Rhodon, who succeeded Didymus in the charge of the Catechetical school of Alexandria, transferred that school to Side, Philip became one of his pupils. If we suppose Didymus to have retained the charge of the school till his death, A. D. 396 [DIDYMUS, No. 4], at the advanced age of 86, the removal of the school cannot have taken place long before the close of the century, and we may infer that Philip's birth could scarcely have been earlier than A. D. 380. He was a kinsman of Troilus of Side, the rhetorician, who was tutor to Socrates the ecclesiastical historic, and was indeed so eminent that Philip regarded his relationship to him as a subject of exultation (Socrates, H. E. 7.27). Having entered the church, he was ordained deacon, and had much intercourse with Chrysostom; in the titles of some MSS. he is styled his Syncellns, or personal attendant, which makes it probable that he was, from the early part of his ecclesiastical career, con
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theodo'sius or Theodo'sius the Great (search)
they found a worthy successor to his orthodoxy in the more vigorous emperor of the East. Theodosius was not baptized until the end of the first year of his reign, when he was admonished by a serious illness no longer to delay this ceremony. In A. D. 380, before he commenced operations tions against the Goths, he was baptized at Thessalonica salonica by the archbishop Ascolius, in the orthodox faith of the Trinity; and his baptism was immeddiately followed by a solemn edict which fixed the faitture of the turbulent and disorderly proceedings which characterised its close. Theodosius, after establishing the supremacy of the Catholic faith by the council of Constantinople, proceeded to give it effect. In the course of fifteen years (A. D. 380-394) he published fifteen decrees against heretics, or those who were not of his own creed. The penalties were most particularly directed against those who rejected the doctrine of the Trinity; and they extended to ministers, assemblies, and th
documents and a careful separation of all spurious and foreign matter proved incontestably that 93 Sermones, 16 of considerable length, the rest comparatively brief, on various subjects of faith, morals, and discipline, were the productions of Zeno, who was ordained bishop of Verona, not under Gallienus as had been supposed, but a century later, about A. D. 363, the year in which Julian perished. They likewise inferred from internal evidence, that he was of African extraction, and died in A. D. 380 or 381. Editions It is unnecessary to enumerate the various editions which appeared in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, since they are either mere copies of the original impression of 1508, or inferior to it from being deformed by arbitrary changes and interpolations. The only text which can be used with advantage is that of the Ballerini (fol. Veron. 1739), which is accompanied by copious notes and dissertations, and has been adopted by Galland in his Bibliotheca Patrum, vol. v