hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 385 AD or search for 385 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

rds the close of the fourth century. Works Of his personal history we know almost nothing, except in so far as it can be gleaned from three tracts which bear his name. 1. Faustini de Triniate s. De Fide contra Arianos ad Flacillam Imperatricem Libri VII. This treatise, the subject of which is sufficiently explained by the title, has been erroneously ascribed to the Spanish bishop Gregorius. It is divided into seven books, or rather chapters, and must have been composed not later than A. D. 385, since Flacilla, the first wife of Theodosius, died in that year. 2. Faustini Fides Theodosio Imperatori oblata. A short Confession of Faith, written probably between the years 379-381, at which period Faustinus appears to have resided at Eleutheropolis. 3. Libellus Precum The Libellus Precum was presented to Valentinianus and Theodosius about A. D. 384. It contains a defence of the tenets of the Luciferiani, craves the protection of the emperors, and is believed to have been the joi
e reign of Sapor, who died in 381. Sapor has been surnamed the Great, and no Persian king had ever caused such terror to Rome as this monarch. Ardishir Ii. 10. ARDISHIR or ARTAXERXES II., the successor of Sapor the Great, reigned from A. D. 381-385. He was a prince of royal blood, but his descent is doubtful, and he was decidedly no son of Sapor. The peace of 363 being strictly kept by the Romans, he had no pretext for making war upon them, if he felt inclined to do so, and we pass on to Shapur Iii. 11. SHAPUR or SAPOR III., who reigned from A. D. 385-390. According to Agathias (iv. p. 136, ed. Paris) he was the son of Sapor the Great; but according to the Persian historians, who, in matters of genealogy, deserve full credit, he was the son of one Shapur Zulaktaf, a royal prince. Shapur was anxious to be on good terms with the emperor Theodosius the Great, and sent a solemn embassy with splendid presents to him at Constantinople, which was returned by a Greek embassy headed by
Ardishir Ii. 10. ARDISHIR or ARTAXERXES II., the successor of Sapor the Great, reigned from A. D. 381-385. He was a prince of royal blood, but his descent is doubtful, and he was decidedly no son of Sapor. The peace of 363 being strictly kept by the Romans, he had no pretext for making war upon them, if he felt inclined to do so, and we pass on to
Shapur Iii. 11. SHAPUR or SAPOR III., who reigned from A. D. 385-390. According to Agathias (iv. p. 136, ed. Paris) he was the son of Sapor the Great; but according to the Persian historians, who, in matters of genealogy, deserve full credit, he was the son of one Shapur Zulaktaf, a royal prince. Shapur was anxious to be on good terms with the emperor Theodosius the Great, and sent a solemn embassy with splendid presents to him at Constantinople, which was returned by a Greek embassy headed by Stilicho going to Persia. Owing to these diplomatic transactions, an arrangement was made in 384, according to which Armenia and Iberia recovered their independence.
ds the close of the year A. D. 398. Works Six epistles by this prelate have been preserved, being, as Du Pin observes, the first decretals which truly belong to the pope whose name they bear. I. Ad Himerium Tarraconensem Episcopum Written A. D. 385, in reply to several questions which had been proposed to Damasus, in reference to the re-admission of Arians; to the period at which baptism ought to be administered; to the forgiveness of contrite apostates; to the lawfulness of marrying a wo proved by Justellus, in his Code of Canons (8vo. Par. 1610, 1615, 1660, Not. ad Canon. 48, Cod. Eccl. Afric.), and by others to be the production of Siricius. Lost Epistles Several epistles have been lost, such as :--Ad Maximum Imperatorem, A. D. 385, praying for the discouragement of the Priscillianists; De Ithacianorum Causa, A. D. 386; Ad Theodosium Imperatorem, against Flavianus; Ad Rufinum, A. D. 398. an account of which, as well as of those falsely attributed to Siricius, will be foun
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theodo'sius or Theodo'sius the Great (search)
after the crime of the Quartodecimans. Though Theodosius thus established the principle of persecution, it is said that his rival Maximus was the first Christian prince " who shed the blood of his Christian subjects on account of their religious opinions." It is fortunate for the fame of Theodosius that there is not the same evidence of his giving effect to his own laws as there is for the severity of Maximus, under whose reign Priscillianus and others suffered death for heresy at Treves, A. D. 385. In A. D. 387 Maximus, not content with the possession of Spain, Gaul, and Britain, aspired to wrest Italy from the feeble hands of Valentinian II., who as an Arian was disliked by his Catholic subjects of Italy, and was opposed in his heretical projects by the zeal of Ambrose, the Catholic archbishop of Milan. Maximus was in sight of Milan, before Valentinian and his mother Justina, who directed the administration, were aware of his hostile intentions; and he entered the city without re
Timo'theus 8. Bishop of Alexandria towards the close of the fourth century, was distinguished for his opposition to Gregory of Nazianzus. He succeeded his brother Peter in the see of Alexandria in A. D. 379, and was present at the second general council at Constantinople, in the year 381, where He was one of the most active agents in the attack upon Gregory of Nazianzus, which caused the retirement of that great and good man, and in the appointment of his successor Nectarius. He died in A. D. 385. He wrote a work on the lives of the fathers and monks, which is quoted by Sozomen (H. E. 6.25), but is now lost. (Cave, Hist. Litt. s. a. 380, p. 274, ed. Basil.; Fabricius, Bibl. Graec. vol. x. pp. 138-293; Clinton, Fast. Rom. s. a. 381). Notices of some other ecclesiastics and Christian writers of the name will be found in the works of Cave, Fabricius, and Schröckh. None of them seem to require specific mention, except a chronographer, who is quoted by G. Cedrenus and Jo. Malala. (See V