hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 394 AD or search for 394 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
Alari'cus in German Al-ric, i. c. " All rich," king of the Visigoths, remarkable as being the first of the barbarian chiefs who entered and sacked the city of Rome, and the first enemy who had appeared before its walls since the time of Hannibal. He was of the family of Baltha, or Bold, the second noblest family of the Visigoths. (Jornandes, de Reb. Get. 29.) His first appearance in history is in A. D. 394, when he was invested by Theodosius with the command of the Gothic auxiliaries in his war with Eugenius. (Zosimus, 5.5.) In 396, partly from anger at being refused the command of the armies of the eastern empire, partly at the instigation of Rufinus (Socrates, Hist. Eccl. 7.10), he invaded and devastated Greece, till, by the arrival of Stilicho in 397, he was compelled to escape to Epirus. Whilst there he was, by the weakness of Arcadius, appointed prefect of eastern Illyricum (Zosimus, 5.5, 6), and partly owing to this office, and the use he made of it in providing arms for his o
Ammon (*)/Ammwn), 1. Bishop of Hadrianople, A. D. 400, wrote (in Greek) On the Resurrection against Origenism (not extant). A fragment of Ammon, from this work possibly, may be found ap. S. Cyril. Alex. Lib. de Recta Fide. (Vol. v. pt. 2, ad fin. p. 50, ed. Paris. 1638.) He was present at the Council of Constantinople A. D. 394, held on occasion of the dedication of Rutinus's church, near Chalcedon. (Soz. Hist. Eccl. viii . 8. 3; Mansi, Concilia. vol. iii. p. 851
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Optimus of Antioch in Pisidia as the centre of catholic communion in the diocese of Asia. In A. D. 383, he obtained from Theodosius a prohibition of Arian assemblies, practically exhibiting the slight otherwise put on the Son of God by a contemptuous treatment of the young Arcadius. (Fleury's Eccl. Hist. 18.100.27.) This same year he called a council at Side in Pamphylia, and condemned the Massalian heretics, who made the whole of religion consist in prayer. (Theodt. Haeret. Fab. 4.11.) In A. D. 394 he was at the Councii of Constantinople [see AMMON of Hadrianople], which confirmed Bagadius in the see of Bostra. This is the last we hear of him. He died before the persecution of St. Chrysostom, probably A. D. 395, and he is commemorated on Nov. 23rd. St. Gregory Nazianzen states, that " by prayers, adoration of the Trinity, and sacrifices, he subdued the pain of diseases." (Carm. ad Vital. vol. ii. pp. 1030, 5.244.) The 9th, 25-28th, 62nd, 171st, and 184th Epistles of St. Gregory are
bourhood of Antioch. In A. D. 378 Meletius was allowed to return to his see, and one of his first acts was to make Diodorus bishop of Tarsus. In A. D. 381 Diodorus attended the council of Constantinople, at which the general superintendence of the Eastern churches was entrusted to him and Pelagius of Laodiceia. (Socrat. 5.8.) How long he held his bishopric, and in what year he died, are questions which cannot be answered with certainty, though his death appears to have occurred previous to A. D. 394, in which year his successor, Phalereus, was present at a council at Constantinople. Diodorus was a man of great learning (Facund. 4.2); but some of his writings were not considered quite orthodox, and are said to have favoured the views which were afterwards promulgated by his disciple, Nestorius. His style is praised by Photius (Bibl. Cod. 223, where he is called Theodorus) for its purity and simplicity. Respecting his life, see Tillemont, Hist. des Emp. viii. p. 558, &c., and p. 802, &c
nity and the love of dress; but a long and severe illness, and the exhortation of Melania Romana, a lady who had devoted herself to a religious life, and had become very eminent, induced him to renounce the world, and give himself up to an ascetic life. He received the monastic garb from the hands of Melania, and departed for Egypt, the cradle of monasticism, where he spent the remainder of his life. Some copies of Palladius are thought to speak of a visit made by him to Constantinople, in A. D. 394; but the passage is obscure, and Tillemont and the Greek text of Palladius, in the Bibliotheca Patrum, refer the incident to Ammonius. Socrates states that he accompanied Gregory Nazianzen into Egypt; but there is no reason to think that Gregory visited Egypt at that time. Evagrius's removal into Egypt was probably late in A. D. 382, or in 383. The remainder of his life was spent on the hills of Nitria, in one of the hermitages or monasteries of Scetis or Scitis, or in the desert " of the
eodosius the Great afterwards exiled him to a place called Halmyris, in Moesia, on the Danube. (Sozom. 7.17; Niceph. 12.29.) But being driven away from that place by the barbarians, he was sent to Caesareia. Here, too, he met with no better reception; for, having written against their bishop, Basilius, he was hated by the citizens of Caesareia. At length, he was permitted to return to his native village of Dacora, where he spent the remainder of his life, and died at an advanced age, about A. D. 394. Eroptius Patricius ordered his body to be carried to Tyana, and there to be entrusted to the care of the monks, in order that his disciples might not carry it to Constantinople, and bury it in the same tomb with that of his teacher Aetius. His works were ordered by imperial edicts to be destroyed. His contemporary, Philostorgius, who himself was a Eunomian, praises Eunomius so much, that his whole ecclesiastical history has not unjustly been called an encomium upon him. Philostorgius wrot
, in the notice of this incident, the name Fabianus, which is probably a corruption of Flavianus. He was eminent for his political sagacity, and his skill in the pagan methods of divination, in the exercise of which he assured Eugenius of victory; and when Theodosius had falsified his predictions, by forcing the passes of the Alps, he, according to Rufinns, "judged himself worthy of death," rather for his mistake as a soothsayer than his crime as a rebel. Eugenius had appointed him consul (A. D. 394), though his name does not appear in the Fasti; and Tillemont infers from the passage in Rufinus that he commanded the troops defeated by Theodosius in the Alps, and that he chose to die on the field rather than survive his defeats; but this inference is scarcely authorized. It is more likely that, as Gothofredus gathers from the letters of Symmachus, he survived the war, and that his life was spared, though he was deprived of his praefecture and his property. It is difficult, however, to
, in the notice of this incident, the name Fabianus, which is probably a corruption of Flavianus. He was eminent for his political sagacity, and his skill in the pagan methods of divination, in the exercise of which he assured Eugenius of victory; and when Theodosius had falsified his predictions, by forcing the passes of the Alps, he, according to Rufinns, "judged himself worthy of death," rather for his mistake as a soothsayer than his crime as a rebel. Eugenius had appointed him consul (A. D. 394), though his name does not appear in the Fasti; and Tillemont infers from the passage in Rufinus that he commanded the troops defeated by Theodosius in the Alps, and that he chose to die on the field rather than survive his defeats; but this inference is scarcely authorized. It is more likely that, as Gothofredus gathers from the letters of Symmachus, he survived the war, and that his life was spared, though he was deprived of his praefecture and his property. It is difficult, however, to
which condition he consented, and they were married, probably about the end of A. D. 387. Tillemont, who rejects the account of Zosimus as inconsistent with the piety of Theodosius, places the marriage in A. D. 386, before the flight of Valentinian; but we prefer, with Gibbon, the account of Zosimus. During the absence of Theodosius in Italy, Galla was turned out of the palace at Constantinople by her step-son, the boy Arcadius, or by those who governed in his name. She died in childbirth, A. D. 394, just as Theodosius was setting out to attack Arbogastes and Eugenius, after giving to Theodosius a daughter, Galla Placidia [No. 3], and apparently a son named Gratian. (Ambros. De Obit. Theodos. Orat. 100.40, and note of the Benedictine editors.) Whether the latter, who certainly died before his father, was the child whose birth occasioned her death, or whether there was a third child, is not clear. Tillemont understands Philostorgius to claim Galla as an Arian ; but the passage in Philo
s this Continuation of Eusebius with the History of the Nicene Council, by Gelasius of Cyzicus; but against all evidence. for Photius expressly distinguishes between the two works, and between their respective writers, comparing the style of one with that of the other. And the pretace to the Continuation quoted by Photitis distinctly asserts the author to have been the nephew of Cyril. The Continuation is not extant. Fabricius, without giving his authority, places the death of Gelasius in A. D. 394. The following writings of a Gelasius of Caesareia are mentioned; but it is not clear to which of the Gelasii they belong. Works 1. An Exposition of the Creed Cited by Leontius, Adv. Nestorium, lib. i., not far from the end. 2. *Th=s despotikh=s *)Epifanei/as *Panh/guris, or *Ei)s ta\ *)Epifa/nia *Lo/gos, A Homily for the Epiphany Twice cited by Theodoret (Eranist. Dial. i. iii.), who classes the writer among " the ancients of Palestine." 3. Practica stoixei/wsis secundum Eccle
1 2