hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 20 20 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 27 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 19, section 185 (search)
And this was the purport of Sentius's oration, Hence we learn that, in the opinion of Saturninus, the sovereign authority of the consuls and senate had been taken away just a hundred years before the death of Caius, A.D. 41, or in the sixtieth year before the Christian saga, when the first triumvirate began under Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus. which was received with pleasure by the senators, and by as many of the equestrian order as were present. And now one Trebellius Maximus rose up hastily, and took off Sentius's finger a ring, which had a stone, with the image of Caius engraven upon it, and which, in his zeal in speaking, and his earnestness in doing what he was about, as it was supposed, he had forgotten to take off himself. This sculpture was broken immediately. But as it was now far in the night, Cherea demanded of the consuls the watchword, who gave him this word, Liberty. These facts were the subjects of admiration to themselves, and almost incredible; for it was a hundred year
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VI. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST, OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 5. (5)—THE REGION OF COLICA, THE NATIONS OF THE ACHÆI, AND OTHER NATIONS IN THE SAME PARTS. (search)
ts destruction by the Heniochi, it was restored, and served as an important frontier fortress of the Roman empire against the Scythians. a city of very considerable opulence, but destroyed by the Heniochi: behind it are the Epageritæ, a people of Sarmatian origin, dwelling upon the range of the Caucasus, and beyond them, the Sauromatæ. It was with these people that MithridatesThis was Mithridates, king of Bosporus, which sovereignty he obtained by the favour of the emperor Claudius, in A.D. 41. The circumstances are unknown which led to his subsequent expulsion by the Romans, who placed his younger brother Cotys on the throne in his stead. took refuge in the reign of the Emperor Claudius: and from him we learn that the ThalliHardouin thinks that the Thalli inhabited the present country of Astrakan. join up to them, a people who border on the eastern side upon the mouthIt was the ancient opinion, to which we shall find frequent reference made in the present Book, that the northern po
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VII. We here enter upon the third division of Pliny's Natural History, which treats of Zoology, from the 7th to the 11th inclusive. Cuvier has illustrated this part by many valuable notes, which originally appeared in Lemaire's Bibliotheque Classique, 1827, and were afterwards incorporated, with some additions, by Ajasson, in his translation of Pliny, published in 1829; Ajasson is the editor of this portion of Pliny's Natural History, in Lemaire's Edition.—B. MAN, HIS BIRTH, HIS ORGANIZATION, AND THE INVENTION OF THE ARTS., CHAP. 4. (5.)—THE GENERATION OF MAN; UNUSUAL DURATION OF PREGNANCY; INSTANCES OF IT FROM SEVEN TO TWELVE MONTHS. (search)
hildren that are born at this period live just as long as others, notwithstanding the opinions of the ancients to the contrary. There are great variations in this respect, which occur in numerous ways. Vestilia, for instance, who was the wife of C. Herdicius, and was afterwards married, first, to Pomponius,Ajasson expresses himself at a loss to identify this Pomponius; but thinks that it may have been either Julius Pomponius Græcinus, consul A.U.C. 759, or L. Pomponius, consul A.U.C. 794, A.D. 41. and then to Orfitus, very eminent citizens, after having brought forth four children, always at the seventh month, had Suillius Rufus at the eleventh month, and then Corbulo at the seventh, both of whom became consuls; after which, at the eighth month, she had Cæsonia, who became the wife of the Emperor Caius.Caius Caligula. The name of this woman, who was first his mistress and then his wife, was Milonia Cesonia. She was neither handsome nor young when Caligula first admired her: but was not
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ARCUS CLAUDII (3) (search)
ARCUS CLAUDII (3) an arch intended to be erected in honour of Claudius' victories in Germany (Dio lx. 8 for victories won by his generals over the Cauchi and the Chatti in 41 A.D.) is shown in several of his coins of 41 A.D. (and following years) (Cohen, Nero Drusus 1-6; Claud. 25-29, 48; BM Imp. Claud. 2, 36, 95-103, 121-123, 187-191). Whether it was actually erected, and if so, where, is uncertain (BM Imp. p. clii). ARCUS CLAUDII (3) an arch intended to be erected in honour of Claudius' victories in Germany (Dio lx. 8 for victories won by his generals over the Cauchi and the Chatti in 41 A.D.) is shown in several of his coins of 41 A.D. (and following years) (Cohen, Nero Drusus 1-6; Claud. 25-29, 48; BM Imp. Claud. 2, 36, 95-103, 121-123, 187-191). Whether it was actually erected, and if so, where, is uncertain (BM Imp. p. clii).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, IUPPITER VICTOR (search)
nites in sacrifice (Liv. x. 29. 14, 18). Livy's statement (x. 42. 7) that in 293 L. Papirius, at the battle of Aquilonia, vowed a cup of new wine to luppiter Victor, is sometimes interpreted as meaning that Fabius' temple had been dedicated by that time, but this is quite hypothetical. According to Ovid (Fast. iv. 621) and Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 92, the day of dedication of the temple (templa) was the Ides of April. Josephus states (Ant. Iud. xix. 4. 3) that after the murder of Caligula in 41 A.D. the consuls summoned the senate ei)s to\ i(ero\n tou= nikhfo/rou *dio/s; and Cassius Dio (Ix. 35) mentions among the prodigies of 54 A.D. 17 h( au)to/matos tou= naou= tou= *dio\s tou= *nikai/ou a)/noicis. These all seem to refer to the same temple, presumably the same aedes Iovis Victoris that is mentioned as standing in Region X in the fourth century in the Notitia (Curiosum om. Victoris). If so, the temple was on the Palatine, but this depends solely on the Notitia (BC 1917, 84-92, where
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
399 (cf. 193) 38Aqua Claudia begun, 22. Anio Novus begun, 11. District called Aemiliana burnt, 1. 41-54Reign of Claudius: Temple of Juppiter Depulsor on Capitol, 292: of Felicitas burnt, 207: of Salus burnt but restored later, 462; Arch of Tiberius near Pompey's Theatre, 45; Porticus Minucia Frumentaria (?), 425; Statues in Temple of Augustus, 62; marble carceres in Circus Maximus, 116; Horti Pallantiani, 270; terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 41 Arch for German victories (?), 36. 43Ara Pietatis Augustae dedicated, 390. 45(before). Facade of Carcer (?), 100. 44-45Cippi of Aqua Virgo, 29. 46Restores Aqua Virgo, 29, 35. 47Aqua Claudia completed (?), 22. 49Pomerium extended to include Aventine, 66, 393. 51-52Arch of Claudius carrying Aqua Virgo over the Via Lata, 29, 35. 52Anio Novus completed, 11. Aqua Claudia dedicated, 22. Porta Praenestina (Maggiore), 412. 54-68Reign of Nero: before 64 A.D. Nero builds Domus Transitoria, 194 ff.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Agrippa the Great (search)
r was added to his dominions. On the death of Caligula, Agrippa, who was at the time in Rome, materially assisted Claudius in gaining possession of the empire. As a reward for his services, Judaea and Samaria were annexed to his dominions, which were now even more extensive than those of Herod the Great. He was also invested with the consular dignity, and a league was publicly made with him by Claudius in the forum. At his request, the kingdom of Chalcis was given to his brother Herodes. (A. D. 41.) IIe then went to Jerusalem, where he offered sacrifices, and suspended in the treasury of the temple the golden chain which Caligula had given him. His government was mild and gentle, and he was exceedingly popular amongst the Jews. In the city of Berytus he built a theatre and amphitheatre, baths, and porticoes. The suspicions of Claudius prevented him from finishing the impregnable fortifications with which he had begun to surround Jerusalem. His friendship was courted by many of the ne
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
f her sister Drusilla, banished her to the island of Pontia, which was situated opposite the bay of Caieta, off the coast of Italy. Her sister Drusilla was likewise banished to Pontia, and it seems that their exile was connected with the punishment of Lepidus, who was put to death for having conspired against the emperor. Previously to her exile, Agrippina was compelled by her brother to carry to Rome the ashes of Lepidus. This happened in A. D. 39. Agrippina and her sister were released in A. D. 41, by their uncle, Claudius, immediately after his accession, although his wife, Messalina, was the mortal enemy of Agrippina. Messalina was put to death by order of Claudius in A. D. 48; and in the following year, A. D. 49, Agrippina succeeded in marrying the emperor. Claudius was her uncle, but her marriage was legalized by a senatuseonsultum, by which the marriage of a man with his brother's daughter was declared valid; this senatusconsultum was afterwards abrogated by the emperors Constan
Alcon a surgeon (vulnerum medicus) at Rome in the reign of Claudius, A. D. 41-54, who is said by Pliny (Plin. Nat. 29.8) to have been banished to Gaul, and to have been fined ten million of sesterces : H. S. centies cent. mill. (about 78,125l.). After his return from banishment, he is said to have gained by his practice an equal sum within a few years, which, however, seems so enormous (compare ALBUCIUS and ARRUNTIUS), that there must probably be some mistake in the text. A surgeon of the same name, who is mentioned by Martial (Epigr. 11.84) as a contemporary, may possibly be the same person. [W.A.G]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Anti'ochus Epiphanes or Anti'ochus Epiphanes (search)
tion. Caligula also gave him the whole amount of the revenues of Commagene during the twenty years that it had been a Roman province. (D. C. 59.8; Suet. Cal. 16.) He lived on most intimate terms with Caligula, and he and Herod Agrippa are spoken of as the instructors of the emperor in the art of tyranny. (D. C. 59.24.) This friendship, however, was not of very long continuance, for he was subsequently deposed by Caligula and did not obtain his kingdom again till the accession of Claudius in A. D. 41. (D. C. 60.8.) In A. D. 43 his son, also called Antiochus Epiphanes, was betrothed to Drusilla, the daughter of Agrippa. (J. AJ 19.9.1.) In A. D. 53 Antiochus put down an insurrection of some barbarous tribes in Cilicia, called Clitae. (Tac. Ann. 12.55.) In A. D. 55 he received orders from Nero to levy troops to make war against the Parthians, and in the year 59 he served under Corbulo against Tiridates, brother of the Parthian king Voloeses. (13.7, 37.) In consequence of his services in th
1 2 3