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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE SURANAE (search)
edicated in the name of his friend (Vict. Caes. 13; Epit. 13). This establishment is represented on fragments of the Marble Plan (FUR 41, 258, 329, 387; Atti del Congresso storico i. 49), and its site is thereby identified with that of the modern restaurant of the Castello dei Cesari, just north of S. Prisca, where some remains have been found and a fragmentary inscription (CIL vi. 1703) recording the restoration of a cella tepidaria by Caecina Decius Acinatius Albinus, praefectus urbi in 414 A.D. (cf., however, Merlin 433, who makes this inscription refer to the thermae Decianae). A previous restoration by the third Gordian is proved by the discovery in 1920 in S. Sabina of part of a marble block, probably the architrave over a door, with a fragmentary inscription-Imp. Caes. Marcus Antonius [Gordianus Augustus] Balneum Surae o[rnandum curavit]-in which this restoration of the text seems justified, especially when compared with a passage from Hist. Aug. Gord. 32. 5: Opera Gordiani R
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
eign of Honorius: Quadriga for victory over Gildo (398 A.D.), 145; Pompey's Theatre restored, 517. 403Monument for victory at Pollentia, 145. Aurelian walls restored, 349; gates, 403, 404, 407, 409, 412. 404Last gladiatorial combats in Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 7. 405Arch of Arcadius and Honorius, 33. 408Earthquake injures Temple of Peace, 386. 410Alaric captures Rome: Basilica Aemilia burnt, 75; Horti Sallustiani sacked, 271. 412Secretarium Senatus restored, 146. 414Suranae restored, 533. 416Basilica Julia restored, 79. 421Statues set up in Theatre of Marcellus, 514. 442Earthquake damages Forum, 235: Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6: Porticus Nova, 429. 443Thermae Constantinianae restored, 525. 450Forum Esquilinum restored, 224. 455Vandal invasion, 235. 468-483Basilica of Junius Bassus becomes a Church, 81. 470Earthquake injures Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6. Rostra Vandalica, 235, 453. 493-526Reign of Theodoric: he repairs Forum, 2
sroes or Khosrew II., surnamed P'hok'hr, or " the Little," the son of Tiridates Mezd.--A. D. 325. Diran or Tiranus I., his son.--A. D. 341. Arsaces or Arshag III., his son. --A. D. 370. Bab or Para.--A. D. 377. Waraztad, usurper.--A. D. 382. Arsaces IV. (and Valarsaces or Wagharshag II., his brother).--A. D. 387. Armenia divided.--A. D. 389. Arsaces IV. dies. Cazavon in Roman Armenia, Chosroes or Khosrew III. in Persarmenia.--A. D. 392. Bahram Shapur (Sapor), the brother of Chosroes III.--A. D. 414. Chosroes re-established by Yezdegerd.--A. D. 415. Shapur or Sapor, the son of Yezdegerd--A. D. 419. Interregnum.--A. D. 422. Ardashes or Ardashir (Artasires) IV.--A. D. 428. End of the kingdom of Armenia. (Comp. Vaillant, Regnum Arsacidarum, especially Elenchus Regum Armeniae Majoris, in the 1st. vol.; Du Four de Longuerue, Annales Arsacidarum, Strasb. 1732; Richter, Histor. Krit. Versuch über die A rsaciden und Sassaniden-Dynastien, Göttingen, 1804; St. Martin, Mémoires historiques et gé
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
t of his camp straightway. Constantius hastened back to Aries, resumed the interrupted siege, and forced Constantine to surrender, whose fate is related in his life. Constantius w;as re w;uded for his victory by Honorius with the consulship (A. D. 414), and was also created comes and patricius. In A. D. 414 he marched against Ataulphus, who supported the claims of the rival emperor Attalus, but was defeated and compelled to give him up to his victor in 416. [ATTALUS.] The reward of ConstantiA. D. 414 he marched against Ataulphus, who supported the claims of the rival emperor Attalus, but was defeated and compelled to give him up to his victor in 416. [ATTALUS.] The reward of Constantius was the hand of Placidia, the sister of Honorius, who, after being a captive of the West-Gothic kings, Ataulphus (to whom she was married), Sigericus, and Wallia, since 410, was given up in 417 by Wallia, who became an ally of the Romans. Constantius afterwards induced him to cede the conquests which he had made in Spain to Honorius, and Wallia received in compensation Aquitania II. and probably also Novenmpopulania, or Aquitania III. From this time Toulouse became the capital of the West-Go
ther article. [CAECILIANUS.] Condemned, punished, but eventually tolerated by Constantine, fiercely persecuted by Constans, and favoured by Julian, the followers of this sect appear to have attained to their highest point of prosperity at the commencement of the fifth century, about which period they were ruled by four hundred bishops, and were little inferior in numbers to the Catholics of the province. The genius and perseverance of Augustin, supported by the stringent edict of Honorius (A. D. 414), vigorously enforced by the civil magistrates, seem to have crushed them for a time; but they revived upon the invasion of Genseric, to whom, from their disaffection to a hostile government, they lent a willing support; they were of sufficient importance, at a later date, to attract the attention, and call forth the angry denunciations of Pope Gregory the Great, and are believed to have kept their ground, and existed as an independent community, until the final triumph of the Saracens and
the reign of Arcadius. This account of Photius (l.c.) seems to be contradicted by a passage of the excerpta (p. 96, ed. Bekker and Niebuhr), in which Eunapius speaks of the avarice of the empress Pulcheria, who did not obtain that dignity till A. D. 414; but the context of that passage shews that it was only a digression in the work, and that the work itself did not extend to A. D. 414. It was written at the request of Oribasius, and Photius saw two editions of it. In the first, Eunapius had gA. D. 414. It was written at the request of Oribasius, and Photius saw two editions of it. In the first, Eunapius had given vent to his rabid feelings against Christianity, especially against Constantine the Great; whereas he looked upon the emperor Julian as some divine being that had been sent from heaven upon earth. In the second edition, from which the excerpts still extant are taken. those passages were omitted; but they had been expunged with such negligence and carelessness, that many parts of the work were very obscure. But we cannot, with Photius, regard this " editio purgata" as the work of Eunapius h
ita Ambros. 100.26, 31, in Galland. Bibl. Patr. vol. ix.; Cod. Theod. 1. tit. 1. s. 2; 3. tit. 1. s. 6; 7. tit. 18. s. 8; 9. tit. 28. s. 2; and tit. 40. s. 13; 10. tit. 10. s. 20; 11. tit. 39. s. 11; 16. tit. 7. s. 4, 5; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Tillemont, Hist. des Emp. vol. v.) Flavia'nus 7. Proconsul of Asia, A. D. 383, one of the Flaviani of Symmachus, and apparently the son of No. 6. Either he or his father was praefect of the city (Rome) A. D. 399, and was sent by Honorius (A. D. 414) into Africa to hear the complaints of the Provincials, and examine how far they were well-founded. Fabricius regards this proconsul of Asia as the Flavian of Himerius; but see Nos. 4 and 5. (Cod. Theod. 12. tit. 6. s. 18; Gothofred and Tillemont, as above.) An inscription in Gruter, 170.5, speaks of "Vir inlustris Flavianus" as the founder of a secretarium for the senate, which was destroyed by fire, and restored in the time of Honorius and Theodosius II. The inscription possibly refers
Flavia'nus 7. Proconsul of Asia, A. D. 383, one of the Flaviani of Symmachus, and apparently the son of No. 6. Either he or his father was praefect of the city (Rome) A. D. 399, and was sent by Honorius (A. D. 414) into Africa to hear the complaints of the Provincials, and examine how far they were well-founded. Fabricius regards this proconsul of Asia as the Flavian of Himerius; but see Nos. 4 and 5. (Cod. Theod. 12. tit. 6. s. 18; Gothofred and Tillemont, as above.) An inscription in Gruter, 170.5, speaks of "Vir inlustris Flavianus" as the founder of a secretarium for the senate, which was destroyed by fire, and restored in the time of Honorius and Theodosius II. The inscription possibly refers to No. 6, or No. 7.
He'lio (*(Hli/wn), or HE'LION, magister officiorum, A. D. 414-417, 424-427, under Theodosius II. He is also called Patricius by Olympiodorus. (Comp. Cod. Theod. 6. tit. 27. s. 20. and 7. tit. 8. s. 14.) He was commissioned by Theodosius to invest with the robe of Caesar, at Thessalonica, A. D. 424, the boy Valentinian III., then in exile [GALLA, No. 3]; and after the overthrow and death of the usurper Joannes, he invested Valentinian at Rome, A. D. 425, with the robes and crown of Augustus. Helio had, before these transactions (A. D. 422), been engaged by Theodosius, by whom he was much esteemed, in negotiating a peace with the Persian king Varanes. (Cod. Theod. 13. tit. 3. s. 17; 6. tit. 27. ss. 17, 18, 19, 20; 7. tit. 8. s. 14; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Olympiod apud Phot. Bibl. Cod. 80; Socrat. H. E. vii 20, 24; Theophan. Chronog. vol. i. p. 134, ed. Bonn; Tillemont, Hist. des Emp. vol. vi.) [J.C.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Hesy'chius HIEROSOLYMITANUS (search)
much disputed. Cyril of Scythopolis, in his life of St. Euthymius (*Bi/os tou= a(gi/ou patro\s h(mw=n *Eu)qumi/ou, Cotel. Eccles. Graec. Monum. vol. iv. p. 31), speaks of Hesychius, "presbyter and teacher of the church," as being with Juvenal patriarch of Jerusalem, when he dedicated the church of the " Laura," or monastery of Euthymius, A. D. 428 or 429. Theophanes records the probolh\, advancement (i.e. ordination ?) of Hesychius, "the presbyter of Jerusalem," A. M. 5906, Alex. era (= = A. D. 414); and notices him again as elninenlt for learning (h)/nqei tai=s didaskali/ais) the year following, A. D. 415. He gives him no higher title when recording his death, A. M. 5926, Alex. era,= = A. D. 434. Photius, who has described some of his works, also calls him" Hesychius, presbyter of Jerusalem," but without mentioning the time when he lived. Yet, notwithstanding these tolerably clear intimations, Miraeus (Auctarium de Scriptor. Eccles. No. clxxv.), Possevinus (Apparatus Sacer, vol. i.
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