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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 425 AD or search for 425 AD in all documents.

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Castinus a general of the emperor Honorius, who was sent, in A. D. 422, with an army into Spain against the Vandals. At the same time Bonifacius, another general of Honorius, was likewise engaged against the Vandals in Spain, but Castinus offended him so much by his arrogant and imprudent conduct, that he withdrew from the war. After the death of Honorius, in A. D. 423, Castinus was believed to be supporting secretly the usurper Joannes; and accordingly when the usurper was put to death in A. D. 425, Castinus was sent into exile. (Prosp. Aquit. Chron. Integr. p. 65], ed. Roncall.) [L.S]
He'lio (*(Hli/wn), or HE'LION, magister officiorum, A. D. 414-417, 424-427, under Theodosius II. He is also called Patricius by Olympiodorus. (Comp. Cod. Theod. 6. tit. 27. s. 20. and 7. tit. 8. s. 14.) He was commissioned by Theodosius to invest with the robe of Caesar, at Thessalonica, A. D. 424, the boy Valentinian III., then in exile [GALLA, No. 3]; and after the overthrow and death of the usurper Joannes, he invested Valentinian at Rome, A. D. 425, with the robes and crown of Augustus. Helio had, before these transactions (A. D. 422), been engaged by Theodosius, by whom he was much esteemed, in negotiating a peace with the Persian king Varanes. (Cod. Theod. 13. tit. 3. s. 17; 6. tit. 27. ss. 17, 18, 19, 20; 7. tit. 8. s. 14; Gothofred. Prosop. Cod. Theod.; Olympiod apud Phot. Bibl. Cod. 80; Socrat. H. E. vii 20, 24; Theophan. Chronog. vol. i. p. 134, ed. Bonn; Tillemont, Hist. des Emp. vol. vi.) [J.C.
Leo'ntius jurists. 1. In a constitution of Theodosius II. of A. D. 425, Leontius, a jurist. was named among other professors at Constantinople, and was honoured with a comitiva primi ordinis, a dignity which thenceforth was only to be acquired by 20 years' service. (Cod. Theod. 6. tit. 21. s. un.) Perhaps he was the first legal professor at Constantinople, for in former constitutions no jurist is named among the professors (Cod. Theod. 13. tit. 3. s. 16, 17): but shortly after the appointment of Leontius, a second professorship of law was added (Cod. Just. 11. tit. 18. s. un. § 1.) Of this Leontius we know no more, unless he be the same person who ten years afterwards is named in several constitutions praefect of Constantinople. (Cod. Theod. 14. tit. 16. s. 3; ib. 6. tit. 28. s. 8 ; ib. 16. tit. 5. s. ult.); this being a dignity to which we know that Themistius the sophist, and other professors of arts, sometimes aspired. (Jac. Gothofred ad Cod. Theod. 14. tit. 9. s. 3, and vol.
so much, that he not only became convinced of his errors, but drew up a solemn recantation addressed to Proculus, bishop of Marseilles, and Cyllinnius, bishop of Aix, while four African prelates bore testimony to the sincerity of his conversion, and made intercession on his behalf. Although now reinstated in his ecclesiastical privileges, Leporius does not seem to have returned to his native country; but laying aside the profession of a monk, was ordained a presbyter by St. Augustine about A. D. 425, and appears to be the same Leporius so warmly praised in the discourse De Vita et Moribus Clericorum. We know nothing further regarding his career except that he was still alive in 430. (Cassianus, de Incarn. 1.4.) Works Libellus Emendationis sive Satisfactionis ad Episcopos Galliae The work, to which we have alluded above, and which is still extant, under the title Libellus Emendationis sive Satisfactionis ad Episcopos Galliae, sometimes with the addition, Confessionem Fidei Catholi
been supposed that this statement has arisen from a confusion between this and some other man of the same name. But Photius distinctly makes the statement on the authority of Olympiodorus himself (w(s au)to/s fhsi). It appears, from what Photius has preserved of his writings, that he was a heathen. Works History Inquiries He wrote a work in 22 books, entitled *)Istorikoi\ lo/goi, which comprised the history of the Western empire under the reign of Honorius, from A. D. 407 to October, A. D. 425 (Clinton, Fast. Rom. anno 425). Olympiodorus took up the history from about the point at which Eunapius had ended. [EUNAPIUS.] The original work of Olympiodorus is lost, but an abridgment of it has been preserved by Photius (Phot. Bibl. 80), who describes the style of the work as being clear, but without force or vigour, loose, and descending to vulgarity, so as not to merit being called a history. Of this Photius thinks that the author himself was aware, and that for this reason he spok
d became a voluminous writer. At what period of his life his different works were produced is not known. His Ecclesiastical History was, as we shall see, written after his disappointment in obtaining the patriarchate : but as his being a candidate for that high office seems to imply some previous celebrity, it may be inferred that his work or works in reply to the emperor Julian's attacks on Christianity were written at an earlier period. On the death of Atticus patriarch of Constantinople A. D. 425 [ATTICUS] Philip, then a presbyter, apparently of the great church of Constantinople, and Proclus, another presbyter, were proposed, each by his own partizans, as candidates for the vacant see; but the whole people were bent upon the election of Sisinnius, also a presbyter, though not of Constantinople, but of a church in Elaea, one of the suburbs. (Socrates, H. E. 7.26.) The statement of Socrates as to the unanimity of the popular wish leads to the inference that the supporters of Philip
d became a voluminous writer. At what period of his life his different works were produced is not known. His Ecclesiastical History was, as we shall see, written after his disappointment in obtaining the patriarchate : but as his being a candidate for that high office seems to imply some previous celebrity, it may be inferred that his work or works in reply to the emperor Julian's attacks on Christianity were written at an earlier period. On the death of Atticus patriarch of Constantinople A. D. 425 [ATTICUS] Philip, then a presbyter, apparently of the great church of Constantinople, and Proclus, another presbyter, were proposed, each by his own partizans, as candidates for the vacant see; but the whole people were bent upon the election of Sisinnius, also a presbyter, though not of Constantinople, but of a church in Elaea, one of the suburbs. (Socrates, H. E. 7.26.) The statement of Socrates as to the unanimity of the popular wish leads to the inference that the supporters of Philip
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philosto'rgius (search)
A. D. 358, according to Gothofredus (Proleg. ad Philost. p. 5, &c.), about A. D. 367, according to Vossius (de Hist. Gr. p. 314). He was 20 years old when Eunomius was expelled from Caesareia [EUNOMIUS]. Like his father Carterius, he warmly embraced the doctrines of Eunomius. Works Ecclesiastical History He wrote an ecclesiastical history, from the heresy of Arius in A. D. 300, down to the period when Theodosius the Younger conferred the empire of the West on Valentinian the Younger (A. D. 425). The work was composed in twelve books, which began respectively with the twelve letters of his name, so as to form a sort of acrostic. In this history he lost no opportunity of extolling the Arians and Eunomians, while he overwhelmed the orthodox party with abuse, with the single exception of Gregorius of Nazianzus. Photius charges him with introducing gross misrepresentations and unfounded statements, and says that his work is not a history, but a panegyric upon the heretics. Philostorg
ricus or THEODERICUS I., king of the Visigoths from A. D. 418 * His accession was not in A.D. 419, as is stated by Gibbon and most writers. See Clinton, Fasti Rom. ad ann. 418. to 451, was the successor of Wallia, but appears to have been the son of the great Alaric. (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, c. xxxv. note 10.) Not content with the limits of his dominions, Theodoric broke the peace which existed between the Visigoths and the Romans, took several places in Gaul, and laid siege to Arles in A. D. 425. He was, however, obliged to retire on the approach of Aetius, with whom he concluded a peace; and he then turned his arms against the Vandals in Spain, upon receiving a sufficient subsidy from the Roman general. Theodoric however was only waiting for a favourable opportunity to attack the Romans again; and accordingly, while the Burgundians invaded the Belgic provinces, Theodoric laid siege to Narbonne in A. D. 436. Aetius displayed his usual activity ; he defeated the Burgundians in batt
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theodo'sius II. or Theodo'sius the Younger or the Younger Theodo'sius (search)
it a desert. In June A. D. 450, Theodosius was thrown from his horse as he was hunting near Constantinople, and received an injury from which he died, in the fiftieth year of his age and the forty-second of his long and inglorious reign. His sister Pulcheria succeeded him, but prudently took for her colleague in the empire the senator Marcian, and made him her husband. Works Codex Theodosianus In the reign of Theodosius, and that of Valentinian III., who was emperor of the West from A. D. 425 to 455, was made the compilation called the Codex Theodosianus. In A. D. 429 the administration of the Eastern Empire declared that there should be formed a collection of the Constitutions of the Roman emperors from the time of Constantine to that date, after the model of the two collections of Gregorianus and Hermogenianus. The arrangement of the constitutions was to be determined by the matter to which they referred, and those which treated of several matters were to be divided, and each
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