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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
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nd set over the Hospital (ptwxotrofei=on) of Pontus. (St. Epiph. ad v. Haer. 75.1.) But nothing could allay the envy of Aerius at the elevation of his companion. Caresses and threats were in vain, and at last he left Eustathius, and publicly accused him of covetousness. He assembled a troop of men and women, who with him professed the renunciation of all worldly goods (a)potaci/a). Denied entrance into the towns, they roamed about the fields, and lodged in the open air or in caves, exposed to the inclemency of the seasons. Aerius superadded to the irreligion of Arius the following errors : 1. The denial of a difference of order between a bishop and a priest. 2. The rejection of prayer and alms for the dead. 3. The refusal to observe Easter and stated fasts. on the ground of such observances being Jewish. St. Epiphanius refutes these errors. (l.c. There were remains of his followers in the time of St. Auguistine. (Adv. Haer. ยง 53, vol. viii. p. 18, which was written A. D. 428.) [A.J.C
his death by the Seleucidae, during the period from 328 to 149 B. C. III. DYNASTY OF THE ARSACIDAE From B. C. 149 to A. D. 428. See below. IV. PERSIAN GOVERNORS From A. D. 428 to 625. V. GREEK AND ARABIAN GOVERNORS from A. D. 632 to 855. A. D. 428 to 625. V. GREEK AND ARABIAN GOVERNORS from A. D. 632 to 855. VI. DYNASTY OF THE PAGRATIDAE from 855 to 1079. The Pagratidae, a noble family of Jewish origin, settled in Armenia in B. C. 600, according to the Armenian historians. They were one of the most powerful families in Armenia. After they had come to tes thereupon applied straightway to Bahram, who invaded Armenia, deposed Artasires, and united his dominions to Persia, A. D. 428. From this time eastern Armenia was called Persarnenia. (Procop. De Aedif. Justin. 3.1, 5; Moses Choren. 3.63, &c.. 415. Shapur or Sapor, the son of Yezdegerd--A. D. 419. Interregnum.--A. D. 422. Ardashes or Ardashir (Artasires) IV.--A. D. 428. End of the kingdom of Armenia. (Comp. Vaillant, Regnum Arsacidarum, especially Elenchus Regum Armeniae Majoris, in the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Artasires or Artasires Artaxias (search)
(Artases or Artaxes.) He was made king of Armenia in 422, by Bahram IV., who ordered or requested him to adopt the name of Ardashir (Artasires or Artaxerxes). As Artasires was addicted to vices of every description, the people, or rather the nobles of Armenia, wished for another king. Since the conversion of prince Gregory (afterwards St. Gregory), the son of Anag, the Arsacid, to the Christian religion, in the time of Constantine the Great, the Armenians had gradually adopted the Christian religion; and there was a law that the patriarch should always be a member of the royal family of the Arsacidae. During the reign of Artasires the office of patriarch was held by Isaac, to whom the nobles applied when they wished to choose another king; but Isaac aware that their choice would fall upon Bahram, the heathen king of Persia, refused to assist them. The nobles thereupon applied straightway to Bahram, who invaded Armenia, deposed Artasires, and united his dominions to Persia, A. D. 428.
secluded spot, he acquired so high a reputation for learning and sanctity, that he was chosen bishop of Lyons about A. D. 434, a dignity enjoyed by him until his death, which is believed to have happened in 450, under the emperors Valentinianus III. and Marcianus. Veranius was appointed his successor in the episcopal chair,while Salonius became the head of the church at Geneva. Works The following works bear the name of this prelate: 1. De laude Eremi This was written about the year A. D. 428, in the form of an epistle to IIilarius of Arles. It would appear that Eucherius, in his passion for a solitary life, had at one time formed the project of visiting Egypt, that he might profit by the bright example of the anchorets who thronged the deserts near the Nile. He requested information from Cassianus [CASSIANUS], who replied by addressing to him some of those collationes in which are painted in such lively colours the habits and rules pursued by the monks and eremites of the Theb
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Hesy'chius HIEROSOLYMITANUS (search)
Christian writer of considerable repute in his day, many of whose writings are extant. The date of his life and his official rank in the church have been much disputed. Cyril of Scythopolis, in his life of St. Euthymius (*Bi/os tou= a(gi/ou patro\s h(mw=n *Eu)qumi/ou, Cotel. Eccles. Graec. Monum. vol. iv. p. 31), speaks of Hesychius, "presbyter and teacher of the church," as being with Juvenal patriarch of Jerusalem, when he dedicated the church of the " Laura," or monastery of Euthymius, A. D. 428 or 429. Theophanes records the probolh\, advancement (i.e. ordination ?) of Hesychius, "the presbyter of Jerusalem," A. M. 5906, Alex. era (= = A. D. 414); and notices him again as elninenlt for learning (h)/nqei tai=s didaskali/ais) the year following, A. D. 415. He gives him no higher title when recording his death, A. M. 5926, Alex. era,= = A. D. 434. Photius, who has described some of his works, also calls him" Hesychius, presbyter of Jerusalem," but without mentioning the time when he
2, Reparatus was banished by Justinian to Euchaida, or Eucayda (Vict. Tun. Chron.), Liberatus accompanied him, and probably remained with him till the bishop's death, in 563. Nothing further is known of him. Works Breviarium Caussae Nestorianorum et Eutychianorum Liberatus is the author of a valuable contribution to ecclesiastical history entitled Breviarium Caussae Nestorianorum et Eutychianorum. It comprehends the history of a century and a quarter, from the ordination of Nestorius, A. D. 428, to the time of the fifth oecumenical (or second Constantinopolitan) council, A. D. 553, and is divided into 24 chapters. It was compiled, as the author tells us in his proem, from " the ecclesiastical history lately translated from Greek into Latin," apparently that translated by Epiphanius Scholasticus [EPIPHANIUS, No. 11], from the Greek ecclesiastical historians; from the acts of the councils and the letters of the fathers, from a document written in Greek at Alexandria, and from the c
mention Clodion, or, as he writes the name, Chlogion, and states that, according to some accounts, he resided in the castle of Dispargum, on the border of the Thoringi, the locality of which is much disputed; that he surprised and took Camaracum (Caulbrai) and subdued all the country as far as the Sumina (Somme); he adds, that some affirmed that Meroveus was of the race of this Chlogion. (Greg. Turon. Histor. Francor. 2.9.) The date of this conquest is not determined. Some place it before A. D. 428, in which year the Clodion who had occupied a part of Gaul was driven out by Aetius: others make this a second and later invasion, placing it as late as A. D. 445, and consider the acquisition as permanent. That Meroveus succeeded Clodion is probable, but it could scarcely have been in more than a petty chieftainship. Whether he was the son of Clodion or his nephew is very doubtful: the accounts of his descent vary; one of them, which makes him the offspring of Clodion's wife by a seamonst
Ecclesiastical History such severe strictures on the election of his more fortunate rival, that Socrates could not venture to transcribe his remarks; and has expressed his strong disapproval of his headstrong temper. On the death of Sisinnius (A. D. 428) the supporters of Philip were again desirous of his appointment, but the emperor, to prevent disturbances, determined that no ecclesiastic of Constantinople should succeed to the vacancy; and the ill-fated heresiarch Nestorius [NESTORIUS], frosinnius. That the work was completed before the death of Sisinnius is probable from the apparent silence of Philip as to his subsequent disappointments in obtaining the patriarchate : but as Sisinnius, according to a more exact chronology, died A. D. 428, we may conclude that the work was finished in or before that year, and, consequently, that the date assigned by Theophanes is rather too late. The style was verbose and wearisome, neither polished nor agreeable; and the matter such as to displ
Ecclesiastical History such severe strictures on the election of his more fortunate rival, that Socrates could not venture to transcribe his remarks; and has expressed his strong disapproval of his headstrong temper. On the death of Sisinnius (A. D. 428) the supporters of Philip were again desirous of his appointment, but the emperor, to prevent disturbances, determined that no ecclesiastic of Constantinople should succeed to the vacancy; and the ill-fated heresiarch Nestorius [NESTORIUS], frosinnius. That the work was completed before the death of Sisinnius is probable from the apparent silence of Philip as to his subsequent disappointments in obtaining the patriarchate : but as Sisinnius, according to a more exact chronology, died A. D. 428, we may conclude that the work was finished in or before that year, and, consequently, that the date assigned by Theophanes is rather too late. The style was verbose and wearisome, neither polished nor agreeable; and the matter such as to displ
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
e treachery, he at the same time warned Bonifacius not to come, because Placidia designed him no good, and Bonifacius, believing what he heard, disobeyed the summons of Placidia. Troops were sent against Bonifacius, and he called in to his aid (A. D. 428) the Vandals from Spain and their king Genseric. The subsequent history of Bonifacius is told elsewhere. [BONIFACIUS.] Aetius, who had stirred up an enemy in Bonifacius, was employed at the same time in fighting against the Franks, whom he defeated A. D. 428, and recovered from them those parts on the Rhine, where they had settled. In the following year Aetius was made commander of the Roman armies, in place of Felix, and he defeated the Goths near Arles, and took prisoner their chief Ataulphus. he also defeated the Juthongi, a German tribe near Rhaetia, and reduced the tribes of Noricum, which had revolted. Aetius had with him in these campaigns Avitus, who was afterwards emperor. In A. D. 431 he also reduced the Vindelici, having