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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
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once the Maecenas and the Aristarchus of the literary men of that period, fostering them by his munificence and training them to excellence by his counsel. We find four letters addressed to him by his friend Sidonius Apollinaris, from the first of which we learn, that this collection of epistles was made at his suggestion and submitted to his criticism and correction. Constantius, at the request of Patiens, bishop of Lyons, drew up a biography of Germanus, bishop of Auxerre, who died in A. D. 448. This work, entitled Vita S. Germani Episcopi Autissiodorensis, appears from the second dedication to have been completed about A. D. 488, and is contained in the compilations of Surius and of the Bollandists under the Saints of July. It was rendered into verse by Ericus, a Benedictine monk of Auxerre, who lived about A. D. 989, and translated into French by Arnauld d'Andilly. Some persons have ascribed to Constantins the "Vita S. Justi Lugdunensis Episcopi," who died in A. D. 390, but t
Eusta'thius 2. Bishop of BERYTUS, was present at the council of Chalcedon in A. D. 451, and had been one of the presidents at the council of Berytus, held in A. D. 448. (Acta Concil. ii. p. 281. ed. Binian.; Zacharias Mitylen.de Mund. Opif p. 166, ed. Barth.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Hesy'chius HIEROSOLYMITANUS (search)
ons of the translator, whom he supposes to have been Hesychius of Salona. The work is cited as the work of Hesychius of Jerusalem by Latin writers of the ninth century. The Latin version is ancient, though subsequent to the time when the Latin version of the Scriptures by Jerome came into general use in the church. Considerable pains are taken in the work to confute the opinions of Nestorius, and, as is thought by many, of Eutyches. Now, as the heresy of the latter was not denounced until A. D. 448, fourteen years after the death of Hesychius of Jerusalem, according to Theophanes, this circumstance would appear fatal to his claims to the authorship. But Tillemont thinks that the opinions controverted are not those of Eutyches, but the nearly similar errors of the Apollinarists [APOLLINARIS, No. 2; EUTYCHES]. 2. *Stixhro\n (or *Kefa/laia) tw=n ib' profhtw=n kai\ *)Hsai/+on, Sticheron (or (Cupita) in duodecim Prophetas Minores et Esaiam. Editions This was published by David Hoesc
is he succeeded for the time; but, after long vacillation, Theodosius at last declared himself against the Nestorians, and banished Irenaeus from his court, about A. D. 435. Irenaeus betook himself to his friends, the Oriental bishops, by whom he was made bishop of Tyre, A. D. 444. In an imperial decree against the Nestorians, which still exists, it is ordered that Irenaeus should be deposed from his bishopric, and deprived of his clerical character. The sentence was carried into effect in A. D. 448. Works Tragoedia seu Commentarii de Rebus in Synodo Ephesina ac in Oriente gestis In his retirement, Irenaeus wrote a history of the Nestorian struggle, under the title of Tragoedia seu Commentarii de Rebus in Synodo Ephesina ac in Oriente gestis. The original Greek is lost entirely. Editions We have an old Latin translation of parts of it, published by Christian Lupus, Louvain, 1682; for, though Lupus entitled his book Variorum Patrum Epistolae ad Coneilium Ephesinum perlinentes,
entinian issued upon this occasion served as a sort of charter, in virtue of which the Roman bishops exercised for centuries undisputed jurisdiction over France, Spain, Germany, and Britain. In the East the struggle was much more complicated, the result much less satisfactory. The Archimandrite Eutyches [ EUTYCHES], in his ve-hement denunciation of Nestorius, having been betrayed into errors, very different indeed, but equally dangerous, was anathematised, deposed, and excommunicated, in A. D. 448, by the synod of Constantinople. Against this sentence he sought redress, by soliciting the interference of the bishops of Alexandria and Rome. By the former his cause was eagerly espoused; the latter, although at first disposed to listen favourably to a complaint which he chose to regard as an appeal from an inferior to a higher court, was eventually induced, either by policy or conviction, to reject the application, and drew up an elaborate epistle to the patriarch Flavianus, in which th
Maximi'nus the excellent ambassador of Theodosius the Younger to Attila in A. D. 448. He was already conspicuous in the Persian war in 422, when he was lieutenant of Ardaburius. Theodosius sent him in 448 to Attila; Orestes and Edicon, the Hunnic ambassadors at Constantinople, returned with him to Pannonia. This Edicon had been bribed by the minister, Chrysaphius, to murder Attila, but on his arrival in Pannonia informed his master of the plot, of which Maximin was totally ignorant. Attila was well aware of this, and consequently turned his resentment only against the emperor and the minister at Constantinople, disdaining even to punish Vigilius, who was the entire promoter of the scheme, and who was entrapped in his turn by Attila. This embassy of Maximin is described by his secretary, Priscus, to whom we refer for the interesting details of an event to which we are indebted for nearly all our knowledge of Attila's person and private life. Maximin became afterwards one of the four p
ks on the side of Aetius. If we suppose that Meroveus was with Attila, we may perhaps adopt the supposition that he was one of the two. Frankish princes, sons of a deceased king, who according to the rhetorician Priscus (apud Excerpta de Legationibus, p. 40, ed. Paris), disputed their father's succession, and claimed the assistance, the one of Attila, the other of Aitius. This would sufficiently accord with the Chronicon of Prosper Tyro, which places the commencement of Meroveus's reign in A. D. 448, but the authority of this probably interpolated chronicle is not great. Meroveus is said to have reigned ten years. That he was the father of Childeric, and the grandfather of Clovis, appears well established; as well as that the first race of the Frankish kings of Gaul derived from him the title Merovingi or Merovinchi, Merovingian; unless we suppose with Sismondi (Hlist. des Francais, ch. iii.) that this name was derived from an earlier Meroveus, the common ancestor of all the kings of
Photius 4. Of TYRE. On the deposition of Irenaeus, bishop of Tyre, in A. D. 448, Photins was appointed his successor. Evagrius (H. E. 1.10) makes the deposition of Irenaeus one of the acts of the notorious Council of Ephesus, held in A. D. 449, and known as the "Concilium Latrocinale :" but Tillemont more correctly considers that the council only confirmed the previous deposition. (Mémoires, vol. xv. p. 268.) Photius of Tyre was one of the judges appointed by the emperor Theodosius II., in conjunction with Eustathius, bishop of Berytus and Uranius, bishop of Himerae in Osrhoiene, to hear the charges against Ibas, bishop of Edessa. Photius, Eustathius, and Uranius, met at Berytus, and Photius and Eustathius again met at Tyre, in the year 448 or 449, heard the charges, acquitted Ibas, and brought about a reconciliation between him and his accusers, who were presbyters of his own church at Edessa. (Concil. vol. iv. col. 627, &c., ed. Labbe, vol. ii. col. 503, &c., ed. IIardouin.) There
astern writers relate several stories of him, some of which are contained in Malcolm's work quoted below, to whom we refer the student, for they are well worth reading. Bahram was accidentally drowned in a deep well together with his horse, and neither man nor beast ever rose again from the fathomless pit. This is historical, and the well was visited by Sir John Malcolm, and proved fatal to a soldier of his retinue. Yezdijird Ii. 15. YEZDIJIRD II., the son of the preceding, reigned from A. D. 448 till 458. He was surnamed " SIPAHDOST," or " The Soldier's Friend." The persecutions against the Christians were renewed by him with unheard of cruelty, especially in Persarmenia, where 700 Magi discharged the duties of missionaries with sword in hand. The Armenians nevertheless resisted bravely, and Christianity, though persecuted, was never rooted out. His relations with Rome were peaceful. Hormuz Iii. 16. HORMUZ, or HORMISDAS III., and 17. FIROES, or PEROSES (*Pero/chs, *Pero/shs, or
Yezdijird Ii. 15. YEZDIJIRD II., the son of the preceding, reigned from A. D. 448 till 458. He was surnamed " SIPAHDOST," or " The Soldier's Friend." The persecutions against the Christians were renewed by him with unheard of cruelty, especially in Persarmenia, where 700 Magi discharged the duties of missionaries with sword in hand. The Armenians nevertheless resisted bravely, and Christianity, though persecuted, was never rooted out. His relations with Rome were peaceful.
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