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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
n his villa near Clermont, he was appointed master of the armies of Gaul. During this period, he twice went as ambassador to the Visigothic court, first in A. D. 450 to Theodoric I., to secure his alliance on the invasion of Attila; secondly in A. D. 456, to Theodoric II., on which last occasion, having received the news of the death of Maximus, and of the sack of Rome by the Vandals, he was, by the assistance of the Visigoths, raised to the vacant throne; but, after a year's weak and insolent Ricimer, and returned to private life as bishop of Placentia. But the senate having pronounced the sentence of death upon him, he fled to the sanctuary of his patron saint lulian, at Brivas in Auvergne, and there died, or at least was buried. (A. D. 456.) His private life is chiefly known from the Panegyric of his son-in-law, Sidonius Apollinarus; his public life from Gregor. Turon. 2.11, and Idatius, Chronicon. [A.P.S] The annexed coin of Avitus has on the obverse the head of Avitus crown
Eudo'cia 2. Daughter of Valentinian 11. and of Eudoxia, daughter of Theodosius II., and consequently grand-daughter of the subject of the precediug article. She was carried captive to Carthage by Genseric, king of the Vandals, when he sacked Rome (A. D. 455), together with her mother and her younger sister Placidia. Genseric married Eudocia (A. D. 456), not to one of his younger sons, Gento, as Idatius says, but to his eldest son Hunneric (who succeeded his father, A. D. 477, as king of the Vandals); and sent Eudoxia and Placidia to Constantinople. After living sixteen years with Hunneric, and bearing him a son, Hulderic, who also afterwards became king of the Vandals, Eudocia, on the ground of dislike to the Arianism of her husband, secretly left him, and went to Jerusalem, where she soon after died (A. D. 472), having bequeathed all she had to the Church of the Resurrection, and was buried in the sepulchre of her grandmother, the empress Eudocia. (Evagrius, Hist. Eccles. 2.7; Marc
Isaacus 5. Surnamed SYRUS, because he was a native of Syria, was first monk and afterwards priest at Antioch, and died about A. D. 456. Works He wrote in Syriac, and perhaps also in Greek, different works and treatises on theological matters, several of them to oppose the writers of the Nestorians and Eutychians. His principal work is De Contemtu Mundi, de Operatione Corporali et sui Abjectione Liber. Editions This was published in the second edition of the Orthodoxographi, Basel, 1569; in the Bibl. Patr. Colon. vol. vi.; in the B. P. Paris, vol. v.; in the B. P. Novissima Lugdun, vol. xi.; and in Galland. Bibl. Patr. vol. xii. In all these collections it is printed in Greek, with a Latin translation, but the Greek text also seems to be a translation from the Svriac. Uncertain which Isaac wrote this work It is very doubtful whether this work was written by Isaac, the subject of this notice, or by another Isaac, the subject of the following article. Neither Trithenius n
t "eminent" (di=oi/ te *Fi/lippoi, "nobiles Philippi") ; but of their country, works, or age, except that they lived long before (pa/ros, "olim") Matron himself, who cannot be placed later than the time of Philip king of Macedon, nothing is known. Philippus PRESBYTER. 22. PRESBYTER. Gennadius (De Viris Illustrib. 100.62) states that Philip the Presbyter was a disciple of Jerome, and that he died in the reign of Marcian and Avitus over the Eastern and Western Empires respectively, i.e. A. D. 456. [AVITUS ; MARCIANUS.] Works He wrote, 1. Commentarius in Jobum 2. Familiares Epistolae Of these, Genadius, who had read them, speaks highly. These Epistolae have perished. Commentarius in Jobum Editions A Commentarius in Jobum addressed to Nectarius has been several times printed, sometimes separately under the name of Philip (two editions, fol. and 4to. Basel, 1527), and sometimes under the name and among the works of Venerable Bede and of Jerome. Vallarsius and the Benedictine
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philippus PRESBYTER. (search)
Philippus PRESBYTER. 22. PRESBYTER. Gennadius (De Viris Illustrib. 100.62) states that Philip the Presbyter was a disciple of Jerome, and that he died in the reign of Marcian and Avitus over the Eastern and Western Empires respectively, i.e. A. D. 456. [AVITUS ; MARCIANUS.] Works He wrote, 1. Commentarius in Jobum 2. Familiares Epistolae Of these, Genadius, who had read them, speaks highly. These Epistolae have perished. Commentarius in Jobum Editions A Commentarius in Jobum addressed to Nectarius has been several times printed, sometimes separately under the name of Philip (two editions, fol. and 4to. Basel, 1527), and sometimes under the name and among the works of Venerable Bede and of Jerome. Vallarsius and the Benedictine editors of Jerome give the Commentarius in their editions of that father (vol. v. p. 678, &c. ed. Benedict., vol. xi. col. 565, &c. ed. Vallars.), but not as his. The Prologus or Praefatio ad Nectarium are omitted, and the text differs very widely fr
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Sidonius Apollinaris (search)
fame, that while still very young he was ranked among the most learned and eloquent of his contemporaries. At an early age he married Papianilla, the child of Flavius Avitus, and upon the elevation of his father-in-law to the imperial dignity (A. D. 456), accompanied him to Rome, and celebrated his consulship in a poetical effusion still extant. The grateful prince raised the husband of his daughter to the rank of a senator, nominated him prefect of the city, and caused his statue to be placed the most important are :-- 1. Panegyricus Avilo Augusto socero dictus Panegyricus Avilo Augusto socero dictus, extending to 602 hexameters with a prologue (praefatio) in eighteen and an epilogue (editio) in eight elegiac couplets. Delivered A. D. 456. 2. Panegyricus Julio Valerio Maioriano Augusto dictus Panegyricus Julio Valerio Maioriano Augusto dictus, extending to 603 hexameters, with a prologue in nine elegiac couplets. Delivered A. D). 453. 3. Panegyricus dictus Authentico August